Killer Bunnies: It’s a Battle of Bunnies

What’s more cute and cuddly than an adorable little bunny? If you’re asking that question, chances are you’ve already lost the game! In Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, you’ll learn that bunnies can be more vicious than meets the eye. This cutthroat card game forces you to collect weapons and build an army of lethal bunnies to wipe out the competition and collect the elusive Magic Carrot. Do you have what it takes to engage in bunny warfare?

Finding the Magic Carrot

The object of Killer Bunnies is to collect as many Carrots as possible in an effort to find the Magic Carrot. However, you’ll have to make sure you have at least one surviving bunny by the end of the game in order to win. You’ll have to balance collecting Carrots with fighting off the other bunnies if you want to make it through the bunny carnage alive.

Killer Bunnies uses a few decks of cards, including a large Carrot deck, a small Carrot deck, and a third deck that players will draw from throughout the game. These cards will include bunnies of different colors and types, Weapons, and draw Carrot cards. There are also cards that have special effects like Heavenly Halo or Bunny Abducting Aliens that add a nice bit of humor to the game.

There are a few ways you can earn extra moves on your turn. By playing a certain combination of bunnies or drawing certain cards, you can leap ahead of the competition and upend your opponent’s strategy.

The card game ends once the last of the large Carrot cards is picked up. Then, the Magic Carrot is determined by whichever player has the large Carrot card that matches the card on the bottom of the small Carrot deck. This means that the winner is chosen randomly, but that the more Carrots you collect, the more likely you are to win.

Defending Your Bunnies

While the overall objective of Killer Bunnies is to collect Carrot cards and find the Magic Carrot, the main gameplay involves waging war with your bunnies. You play your bunnies by placing them within the Bunny Circle, waging war against the other bunnies on the board. You’ll need to buy, trade, and negotiate with the other players if you want to make it through long enough to see the end of the game.

Most of the cards must be played in the Rabbit Run, which holds two cards at a time. This means that cards will take two turns to actually get into play, giving you a chance to plan ahead and guess which cards your opponents currently have on the docket. However, some cards are either Special or Very Special, which means you can play them right out of your hand. 

Killer Bunnies Sequels

In addition to Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, there are a few sequels and expansions that can expand the game into all-out bunny warfare. Killer Bunnies and the Conquest of the Magic Carrot can either be played on its own or integrated into the original game. It has the same goal as the first game, but it contains extra booster packs for added variety.

There’s also a non-collectible card game version of Killer Bunnies called Kinder Bunnies: Their First Adventure that is geared towards young children. This spinoff card game features more simplistic gameplay that eschews the bunny-killing in favor of teaching kids to avoid safety hazards as they collect Carrots. The bright graphics and fun activities make it a perfect card game for teaching kids about skills like reading and teamwork.

Killer Bunnies: May the Best Bunny Win

Killer Bunnies is playable by 2-8 players, so it’s a great card game for any size group. It’s suitable for ages 12 and up due to the somewhat dark humor of the bunny-killing, although the mechanics are simple enough for children as young as 8. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which is a decent amount of time to really get into it without growing tired of the game.

Channel your inner predator and buy Killer Bunnies today

 

Fluxx: Bow Down To the Cards

If you have a hard time following the rules, you’re not alone. Learning the rules of a card game can be a competition in and of itself, causing you to scratch your head and fight over whether or not you’re allowed to play a Draw 2 on top of another Draw 2. But in the card game Fluxx, learning the rules actually is the point of the game! 

This challenging and wacky card game allows you to change the rules every time you play, constantly switching up the game and morphing it into something entirely new. You’ll have a blast as you lay down card after card, leveling the playing field and knocking the frontrunner off his high horse.

Changing the Rules

Fluxx is a card game with constantly changing rules. The more cards you play, the more the rules change. This makes the game incredibly difficult to plan ahead and manage your hand, as you’re constantly having to shift your strategy along with the rules. New cards will change things like how the cards are drawn, how they’re played, and how many cards you’re allowed to hold onto at one time.

Fluxx begins with some basic rules, with one player shuffling the deck and giving each player three cards. Each player is allowed to draw and play one card per turn, while there is no limit to the cards you’re allowed to hold in your hand. However, as soon as someone plays a card, those simple rules become not so simple. 

For example, a player can play a New Rule card that forces everyone to draw five cards per turn instead of one. Players can also play cards that allow you to play three cards at once, or that limit the number of cards in your hand to only one at a time. If at any point a new rule contradicts an old one, the old rule is discarded in favor of the new.

Keeper, Goal, and Action Cards

The overall goal of Fluxx is to match Keeper cards with Goal cards. The Keeper cards will have certain requirements that the Goal cards have to match. For example, the War Keeper card matches the War = Death Goal card, meaning that if you play both cards on the table, then you win the game.

However, the twist of this card game is that the goals change just like the rules do. You might manage to assemble the right combination of Keeper cards only to find that you’re too late and the goal has changed to something else. You’ll have to stay on top of the ever-changing rules and goals if you want to win the game.

To make things even more complicated, Fluxx also throws in Action cards that allow you to perform random actions. The “Taxation!” card allows you to take cards from the other players, while the “Let’s Do That Again!” card allows you to search through the discard pile and play any Action or New Rule card you choose.

Fluxx Sequels

The joy of Fluxx is that they have released countless sequel card games, promo cards, and themed editions of the original card game. Adventure Time Fluxx has the same rules as the original card game but allows you to play with your favorite characters from the classic Cartoon Network TV show. Join Jake the dog and Finn the human on their adventures in the City of Thieves as you deal with the changing rules!

Doctors and anatomy-lovers will rejoice at Anatomy Fluxx, which allows you to play with cards that correspond with body parts. Play with cards like Blood Vessels and Bones as you fight against the deadly Virus and Mutation. You’ll also have to avoid UnGoals like Cancer that will cause you to instantly lose the game.

Can You Keep Up With All the Changes In Fluxx?

Fluxx is playable by 2-6 players, so it’s a good card game for small parties or families. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, making it accessible to both kids and adults alike. Playing time lasts around 5-30 minutes, as it entirely depends on the luck of the draw.

Buy Fluxx today and enjoy the chaos of this random card game!

 

Bananagrams: Quit Monkeying Around!

Bananagrams is one of those classic word games that almost everyone has an edition of sitting around somewhere in their closet. With the trademark little felt banana bag and those user-friendly letter tiles, you can easily mix and match words to create your own crossword and be the first to shout out “Bananagrams!” If you’re a fan of classic word games like Scrabble or Boggle but are looking for something a little more fast-paced, you’ll love Bananagrams.

Arranging the Tiles

Bananagrams is an incredibly simple and fast-paced game that uses small tiles to form words in the shape of a grid. In this sense, it is incredibly similar to Scrabble, although Bananagrams gets rid of the game board and speeds things up by allowing each player to make their own grid. To make their words, players get to use 144 tiles that all come in a cute little bag shaped like a banana.

Bananagrams begins with all of the tiles being flipped and placed in the center of the table. Each player then takes 12 tiles and begins arranging them into words in the form of a grid, similar to the way a crossword is set up. Once a player uses up all of the letters in their bunch, they shout “peel!” and everyone has to take a new tile from the pool in the center.

If you’re stuck with a bunch of bum letters that you can’t place, then you can dump one of your tiles and draw three more. While this can help you dig your way out of the hole, beware! You may only find yourself deeper in the pit with more tiles you can’t use. Once the pool in the center of the table is almost empty, then the first person to use all of their tiles shouts out “Bananagrams!” and wins the game.

Variant Rules

Bananagrams is incredibly simple, with hands usually taking as little as 5 minutes. However, there are different variant rules within the game itself that you can use depending on where you are and how complex you want the game to be. The Banana Smoothie of the board game gives everyone their own bunch of tiles right at the start of the game, dividing it equally among everyone. This allows you to plan out your whole crossword right at the beginning.

The Banana Cafe version of Bananagrams is meant to be played in public when waiting for service. Players play with 21 tiles and are allowed to dump tiles and draw more if they need to, but they don’t have to “peel” and force anyone else to draw more tiles. You can also play the Banana Solitaire version of Bananagrams to play the game all on your own, competing against your own best time.

Bananagrams Sequels

There are several sequels to the original Bananagrams board game that allow you to play it with new and complex rules. Bananagrams Duel! turns the board game into a two-player word game that uses both letter cubes and Banana cards. Players use any side of their 12 letter cubes to try to create a crossword grid, competing for Banana cards to see who can win the most rounds.

Bananagrams Party adds 14 more “party power” tiles to the original game. These tiles range from The Re-Gifter to The Thief to Switcheroo, with each giving you a special power to use against your opponents. Bananagrams WildTiles adds 6 wild monkey tiles to the game, each of which can be used as whatever letter you like. This is similar to the wild tiles in Scrabble, which can help you make a new word when you can’t seem to find the letter you need. 

Bananagrams: Wordplay Never Tasted So Sweet

Bananagrams is playable by 1-8 players, so you can easily play it with the whole family or just on your own when you’re killing time. It’s suitable for ages 7 and up, as anyone can grasp the simplicity of the rules. Playing time lasts around 15 minutes, although you’ll definitely be playing best of 5 or best of 10.

Buy Bananagrams and add this classic tile game to your collection of word games!

 

Red Dragon Inn: Party Like a Hero

Sure, everybody knows the story of the heroic adventurers who save the day, slay the evil monsters, and collect their share of the treasure.  But what happens to them after they’ve finished their righteous conquest?  A night of drinking, gambling, and roughhousing of course.  Red Dragon Inn is a comical game with rapscallion characters engaged in a debauched good time.  

Choose Your Adventurer

In Red Dragon Inn, players get to choose between four different heroic adventurers who’ve just come back from a fresh conquest.  Each character comes with their own special deck of cards that provides them with unique abilities during the game.  The first is Deirdre the Priestess, an elf under the protection of a goddess that can get her out of scrapes and help her heal.  

Fiona the Volatile, on the other hand, is a tough female warrior who can cheer on her fellow players to drink more heavily while turning her own drinks into greater strength.  Gerki the Sneak comes with plenty of cheat cards that make him an excellent gambler (as well as a few poisons hidden up his sleeves).  The last is Zot the Wizard, whose half-demonic pet rabbit Pookey aids him in his quest to drain the other players of their gold.

Gambling, Drinking, and Roughhousing

Every player gets their own board where they can store their decks, discards, and drink cards.  Players start out with ten gold coins and seven cards that they can use to gamble, drink, and gain the upper hand against the other players.  Each turn gives you several options: you can discard however many cards you like and redraw, you can play an action card, or you can buy a drink for someone else.

Buying a drink for someone else will add another drink card to their stack, but it also forces you to take a drink yourself by drawing a card from your own stack.  While this may end up raising your alcohol content and getting you one step closer to passing out, you may end up gaining fortitude from the drink.  You can only play one action card per term, and these cards will usually force the other players to either take damage or drink more.  

Hold Onto Your Coins—and Your Sobriety

Some action cards will trigger a round of gambling, which invites each of the players to bet their gold and play their gambling cards.  Some characters are better at gambling than others, so your character’s profile will play heavily into your strategy of whether or not to favor gambling or drinking.

If a player’s alcohol content gets too high, they’ll pass out and lose the game.  However, running out of gold coins from gambling too much will also kick you out of the game.  The winner is whoever manages to be the last person to hold onto their coins and stay conscious.

Red Dragon Inn Sequels

Red Dragon Inn has spawned a handful of standalone sequel games that can also be integrated with the original game.  Red Dragon Inn 2 adds characters such as Dimli the Dwarf, a gold-hoarder who can handle his liquor like nobody’s business.  It also adds Fleck the Bard, a music loving half-elf who steals the hearts of all the girls.

Red Dragon Inn 6: Villains puts a unique twist on the premise of the game by taking on the villain’s perspective.  With this dark and twisted sequel, you can engage in Boss Battle mode that pits all the players against one evil villain.  No matter which Red Dragon Inn sequel you choose, you’ll be able to enjoy fun new characters that can make the original game even more expansive.

Enjoy the Spoils of the Hunt with Red Dragon Inn

Red Dragon Inn is suitable for ages 13 and up, mostly due to its slightly adult themes.  It can serve 2-4 players, but adding expansion can allow for larger groups and parties of up to 8.  Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which should make for a decent round of debauched fun.  With Red Dragon Inn, you’ll be sure to enjoy its lighthearted nature and clever spin on the classic “hero.”

 

 

How to Play The Red Dragon Inn

Jenga: How High Can You Go?

Jenga is one of those party games that never gets old. We all remember the heart-pounding tension of trying to wiggle out that little wooden block without causing the whole tower to topple over. Because Jenga is more focused on physical dexterity than strategy, you’ll be sure to enjoy refining your tower stacking skills with this classic board game that never disappoints.

Building the Tower

Jenga is played with 54 wooden blocks that are each three times as long as they are wide. The blocks are stacked three in a row side by side to form a square, with three blocks then stacked perpendicularly on top of the previous stack. This means that if the bottom row of blocks is facing north and south, then the row above will face east and west (and so on and so forth).

The game begins with one player building the tower by stacking the rows of blocks on top of each other. There are going to be a total of 18 different stories of blocks once the tower is first built, although the number of stories will increase once the game has begun. Jenga usually comes with a loading tray that helps you stack the initial tower, since it would usually be pretty tedious doing it by hand.

One of the trickiest aspects of this party game is that each Jenga block is not created to be identical. Each block has small, random variations that make stacking them more difficult and make the game more challenging.

Deconstructing the Tower

The game is then played in turns as each player takes one block from almost any level of the tower and places it on top of the tower. The only level you’re not allowed to take a block from is either the top incomplete level or the one below it. This means that you’ll have to find certain blocks within the tower that you can safely remove without threatening the integrity of the tower itself.

If you end up knocking over the tower, then you lose the game. You’ll want to move carefully as you remove blocks, as one wrong move can result in a pile of fallen Jenga blocks. Some players find it helpful to tap a block before removing it to make sure that they can get it out without knocking over the tower. However, you must only use one hand at a time to remove blocks from the tower.

After each turn, players are allowed to wait 10 seconds before taking the next turn in order to see whether or not gravity will take its course and knock the tower over. If you remove a block and the tower falls over within 10 seconds, then you lose the game. If the tower falls over in the middle of the other player’s turn after 10 seconds have passed, however, then they lose even if they have yet to touch the tower.

Jenga Sequels

There are a few sequel versions of Jenga that add fun new mechanics to the game and make it a bit more complex. Jenga: Super Mario allows you to play as characters such as Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, or Toad by taking character pegs and slotting them into blocks inside the tower. Players will use a spinner to decide how many layers their character is allowed to climb and how many blocks they have to remove.

There’s also a Monopoly Jenga that combines all of the fun of Jenga with the classic board game Monopoly. This version of Jenga is similar to the block balancing mechanics of the regular party game, but each block represents properties you need to collect and may earn you points or abilities.

Move Gently with Jenga

Jenga is playable by 1-8 players, as it’s just as fun to play by yourself as it is with a small group of friends. It’s suitable for ages 6 and up, so it’s a great party game to play at kid’s parties or with families. Playing time for Jenga lasts around 20 minutes, but you’ll almost certainly want to play multiple rounds.

Buy Jenga today and let the blocks fall where they may!

 

Patchwork: Can You Put All the Pieces Together?

Tile-laying board games can be super fun for anyone who loves abstract strategy or puzzles. Patchwork gives you all of the fun of these classic board tile-laying board games wrapped up tightly in a big, snuggly quilt. The goal of Patchwork is to piece together the most finely crafted, tight-knit quilt possible in order to earn the highest amount of buttons and win the game. Do you have what it takes to put the pieces together?

Purchasing Patches

Players are each given their own 9×9 game board on which to patch together their quilt, laying the pieces down in whichever arrangement they choose. In order to earn more buttons, you’ll want to cover up as much of your board as possible by making sure the pieces fit snugly together.

At the beginning of the board game, players are given five buttons with which to purchase patches for their quilt. Players will lay out all of the patches in a circle in random order, then place a spool on a spot along the circle. Each turn gives you two options: either purchase one of the three patches located clockwise to the spool or pass.

Buying patches requires you to pay the cost in buttons as indicated on the patch. If you choose to buy a patch, you’ll move the spool to that patch’s location in the circle and add the patch to your board. Remember, you’re trying to fit the pieces together as tightly as possible, so be sure there’s room for it on your board before you fork over the buttons.

Time Tokens

The length of the game is measured using tokens on a time track. Once your turn is up, you’ll move your token along the time track however many spaces are indicated on the patch you purchased. If your time token is either behind the other player’s token or on top of it, then you get to go again. If your time token is in front of theirs, then it’s your opponent’s turn.

If you decide to pass instead of buying a patch, then you’ll move your time token to the space directly in front of your opponent’s. You’ll also earn one button for every space you moved. The time track also contains five 1×1 patches, which players can claim if they manage to get there before the other player. These are perfect for filling in holes on your board and boosting your points.

Players also have a chance to earn button income each time they pass a button on the time track. Each of your patches will indicate a certain number of buttons between zero and three. Once you’ve passed the button spot, you’ll add up all of the button income on your quilt and take it from the bank.

The game ends once both players reach the center of the time track. Players will then score one point for every button they have and lose two points for every empty square on their board. The player who collected the most points wins the game!

Patchwork Sequels

Patchwork comes with two sequel board games that take the original fun of Patchwork and morph it into something new. Patchwork Doodle is a roll-and-write version of the original game, allowing you to draw in the pieces of your quilt instead of laying the pieces. 

Patchwork Express takes the original game and brings it down to a smaller scale. With a 7×7 game board and larger pieces, this board game simplifies the original game and makes it perfect for players as young as six.

Become the Button Master with Patchwork

Patchwork is a two-person game, as it comes with only two playing boards. It’s perfect for one-on-one games between kids and adults. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, as younger players can easily pick up the rules without too much trouble. The great thing about Patchwork is that it’s easy to learn, but hard to master.

Playing time lasts between 15-30 minutes, so you can easily play a few rounds or just fit in a quick game before dinner. Buy Patchwork today and become the ultimate master of the buttons!

 

Trouble: The Perfect Children’s Game For Troublemakers

Trouble gets a bad rap for being too simple, but the reality is that this board game is perfectly crafted to teach younger players the fun of board games. Trouble has simple enough game mechanics that players as young as four can take part in the fun without getting tripped up by complicated rules. Plus, players of all ages can agree that nothing is more satisfying than pressing the little plastic Pop-O-Matic in the center of the board and hearing it “pop!”

Pop-O-Matic

Trouble is a roll-and-move game where players are competing to be the first to move all four of their pawns to the end of a circuit. The fun centerpiece of the board game is called a Pop-O-Matic, which is a plastic bubble containing a six-sided die. Instead of manually rolling the die, players will push down on the little bubble to let the Pop-O-Matic roll it for you. This has the added advantage of not only allowing younger players to roll but also making sure you never lose the die.

Trouble uses a board game with a circuit of tracks weaved around the board. Each space has a little peg hole for you to insert your pawn into each time you move forward. Players will begin with each of their pawns at their own unique start space. They’re then given the goal to move all four of their pawns to their own individual finish space located at the corner of the board.

Each turn, a different player will roll the die and move their pawn the number of spaces shown by the die. To start the game and move one of your pawns out of the home space, you’ll need to roll a 6, which then allows you to roll again. When sliding into the finish space, you must roll the exact number of spaces between your pawn and the endzone, which can make it tricky to get all the way there.

Bumped Back To Home

One thing that can throw a wrench in your plans really quickly is when another player lands on your space. When this happens, your pawn gets bumped all the way back to the start. This can make for some bruised feelings among more competitive players, but that’s the risk you take when you’re playing Trouble!

Trouble is best suited for younger players, as there is not much strategy involved in rolling the die. However, you can choose which of your pawns to move forward with each roll, so there is some measure of tactic involved beyond just sheer luck. Still, Trouble is an excellent game to teach younger players about the rules of board games. You can easily use it to work your way up to more complex games as time goes on.

Trouble Sequels

Trouble has a few sequel board games that give the original game a new twist or theme. Trouble: Netflix Super Monsters edition is inspired by the popular Netflix program called “Super Monsters”. Instead of nameless pawns, players can choose to play as their favorite characters from the show such as Katya or Frankie as they make their way across the board.

There’s also a Harry Potter version of Trouble called Harry Potter: Triwizard Maze Game. This version of Trouble adds new Maze cards that make the game a bit more complex. Whenever you land on one of the 10 Draw spaces on the board, you have to draw a card that can either help or hurt you. You may be in luck in that you get to go again, or it may hurt you in that you lose your next turn. Anything’s possible!

Stay Out of Trouble!

Trouble is playable by 2-4 players. It’s a good game for parents to play with their kids or for siblings to play together. It’s suitable for ages 4 and up, so this may be the perfect starter board game to teach little kids about rule-following in board games. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which is usually the perfect amount of time to capture kids’ attention without boring them.

Buy Trouble today and enjoy how good it feels to bounce your opponents back to the start!

Choose Your Own Adventure With Gloomhaven

Unlike card games that pit players against each other in a winner-takes-all campaign, Gloomhaven forces you to work together in order to survive.  This card game is set in a mysterious and changing world, casting you as the wandering adventurer with a private mission.  Players will work together to clear enemy-filled dungeons and forgotten ruins in an effort to boost their abilities and plunder more loot.

Choose Your Power

In the card game Gloomhaven, players have to work together to clear dungeons of the vicious monsters lurking inside and collect their loot.  Each player begins with a hand of cards that represent their character’s stamina and abilities.  All of the cards have initiative values on them, which determine the order of play.

The dungeon begins with each player revealing their cards at the same time and flipping over the monster cards.  Then, players will go in order of initiative.  Every card has two abilities on it: a top ability and a bottom ability.  When it’s your turn, you must choose two cards to play, using the top ability from one card and the bottom ability from another.

Clear the Dungeon and Meet Your Goal

The goal of each round is to clear the dungeon of monsters so that you can win the loot.  Characters don’t get killed off in Gloomhaven, but instead exhaust and get booted out of the game for that round.  The more players get eliminated each round, the harder it becomes for the other players to complete the scenario and vanquish the monsters.

You won’t play as the same character throughout the entire card game.  Every character in Gloomhaven has his or her own unique goal that they’re trying to achieve.  Once they meet that goal, that character retires.  This then allows you to unlock new characters with interesting new abilities that make the gameplay even more varied.

Gloomhaven also has many events that happen outside of your main dungeon-clearing adventures.  The City Event Deck and Road Event Deck offer interesting scenarios that either reward or punish you based on your decisions.

One of the most unique elements of Gloomhaven is the cute little game components that come with the cards.  This card game includes 17 playable character miniatures that you can play with as well as 34 monster types and 13 Boss monsters.  You’ll also get over 1500 cards in the box, making Gloomhaven a card game with limitless potential.

Gloomhaven Sequels

Gloomhaven has two sequel card games that use many of the same mechanisms but take place in new worlds.  Frosthaven is set in a small outpost far to the north, suffering from harsh weather and invasions of deadly forces.  Players will get even more characters, enemies, and a new 100-scenario campaign to explore.  Players can also explore more scenarios outside of combat, including solving mysteries and surviving the deadly seasons.

Gloomhaven: Jaws of the Lion is another standalone sequel game that’s actually a prequel.  This game includes four new characters that can be integrated into the original card game.  It also includes 16 new monster types and a new 25-scenario campaign.  Unlike Gloomhaven, which can be incredibly complex, Gloomhaven: Jaws of the Lion is simplified enough for non-gamers and new players to ease into the experience.

Gloomhaven: Leave Your Legacy

Gloomhaven is playable by 1-4 players.  Whether you’re looking for a game to play solo or with a small group of gamer friends, this is the card game for you.  It’s also suitable for ages 14 and up, so teenagers and adults alike can enjoy hosting Gloomhaven gatherings.  Playing time lasts around 1-2 hours, so it’s definitely the kind of game that requires more of a time commitment.

Gloomhaven stands apart from other card games in that it provides you with endless possibilities to choose your own adventures.  After each scenario, players will have to decide what to do next, sending the story shooting off into an endless number of directions. Each decision will have an impact on where the story takes you, allowing you to play Gloomhaven countless times without playing the same game twice.

Fulfill the divine quest set aside for you and buy Gloomhaven today!

 

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