Phase 10: Don’t Get Left Behind!

If Rummy and Uno had a baby, it would be Phase 10. This card game uses colorful numbered cards to force you to collect unique sets in a race against your opponents. It’s a fast-paced game that’ll keep you on your toes as you draw and discard cards while pondering your opponents’ next moves. If you’re looking for a fun alternative to Rummy that you can play on the go, then Phase 10 is the perfect card game for you.

Completing the Phases

Phase 10 is played in multiple rounds, with each round forcing you to collect a certain set of cards in order to advance. At the beginning of the first round, all of the players are in Phase 1. This requires you to collect two sets of three identical numbers. Players will go around in a circle drawing and discarding one card at a time. 

Once a player completes the phase and discards their last card, the round ends. All the players who still have cards in their hands will receive a penalty to their score based on the number of cards they have left and their value. When the next round begins, all the players who collected the right cards to complete Phase 1 get to move onto Phase 2. Everyone else is forced to complete Phase 1 again.

Phase 10 continues for multiple rounds until one player manages to be the first to complete all 10 phases. The trick of the game comes from being able to know which cards to discard in order to quickly catch up and beat out the other players. While the rules are pretty simple, there is a little wiggle room for a strategy that can make this card game more complex than meets the eye.

Special Cards

There is another element of Phase 10 that makes it a bit more challenging: the special cards. These cards can really throw a wrench in the works by allowing you to skip over opposing players during their turn. You can also draw wild cards that can have any color or number that you choose, allowing you to complete your set.

One thing that can bog down Phase 10 is the length of the game time. If you play it according to the traditional rules, games can often last upwards of 2 hours. However, there is a common house rule that many people employ to speed things up and make the most use of the points system of the game. 

By allowing everyone to advance to the next phase regardless of whether or not they manage to complete the set, then you can get to the finish line much faster. If you play Phase 10 using this house rule, then the player who has the best score by the end of the game is crowned the winner. This can incentivize you to complete your sets and win as many phases as possible.

Phase 10 Twist

Phase 10 Twist is a sequel to the original card game that adds some interesting twists to the original game. Instead of just using a deck of cards, Phase 10 Twist comes with a board with a phase track. This can be used to move players along and easily score the game without having to count the cards every time.

This sequel card game also includes Twist spots that force players to choose a different phase to complete than the one they originally were assigned. Players can choose from the optional Twist phases that are more difficult than the regular phases but offer more of a reward for completing. This card game also includes three discard piles, giving you an additional strategic element to consider when shedding cards.

Better Keep Up with Phase 10

Phase 10 is playable by 2-6 players, so it’s an easy card game to play on a family camping trip. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, as it’s easy to comprehend and quick to pick up. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes to 2 hours, although it can be much shorter if you use the optional house rule.

Buy Phase 10 today and enjoy the lovechild of Rummy and Uno!

 

Checkers: The Game that Spawned a Million Tournaments

Checkers is arguably one of the most well known board games of all times.  It’s been featured in countless movies and has been the subject of millions of tournaments hosted by international checkers associations.  You can hardly go for a walk through the park without seeing a pair of players ruminating over a checkers board.  But this timeless board game has reached international notoriety for two reasons: its simple rules and its endless strategies.  Even two players who know nothing about each other can connect over the mind sport that is checkers!

Jumpin’ Jumpin’

Checkers is played by two opponents who start out on opposite sides of the board.  The board is set up with dark and light checkered spaces, while each player plays with either light or dark pieces.  Only the dark checkered spaces are used in the game as players move their pieces across the board in an attempt to capture their opponent’s pieces.  Players are allowed to move one piece per round, either moving the piece diagonally into an unoccupied space or capturing the other player’s piece.  

To capture your opponent’s piece, you have to be able to jump diagonally over them.  You can’t jump over two pieces that are in a diagonal row, as there must be an empty space on the other side of the piece in order to make the jump.  However, you can jump over multiple pieces in one turn provided these are done in successive jumps.  Much of the fun of checkers comes with the zigzag moves where you sweep half the other player’s pieces off the board in one fell swoop (to their dismay).

King Me!

The simple setup of checkers makes it a bit more accessible to younger players than chess, although there is one thing that makes checkers more than just a game of jumping jacks.  If either player manages to get one of their pieces all the way to the opposite side of the board, their piece becomes a king.  Not only does this mean you get to stack a second piece on top of the first, but you also gain the ability to move your piece backwards and even capture pieces backwards.

Checkers In Different Countries

Many different countries have their own versions of checkers that add new rules and switch up the game board.  Because checkers is the American name for the English game of draughts, different versions of checkers are referred to as draughts.  

While American checkers takes place on an 8×8 game board, international draughts is played on a 10×10 board.  International draughts also allows kings to move more than one space at a time in one diagonal direction provided there are no pieces blocking the way.  Turkish draughts is unique in that it starts with the pieces placed one row forward, and also uses every space on the board instead of every other space.

Checkers Tournaments

Checkers has long been played in tournaments and championships ever since the World Championship was established in 1840.  These tournaments bring checkers players from all over the world to employ their own unique strategies to beat the competition.  Because checkers deals with abstract strategy, it can be as complicated or as easy as you want it to be.  Young kids will get just as much out of a game of checkers as the most advanced tournament player!

Checkers: The Ultimate Mind Sport

Checkers is a one-on-one game, so only two players can play it at a time.  However, if you have multiple checkers boards, you can easily play the game in rotating pairs to give everyone a chance to join in on the fun.  Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, so you have a decent amount of time to develop your winning strategy for capturing your opponent’s pieces.

Checkers is suitable for ages 6 and up, which makes it the perfect introductory game for kids.  With incredibly simple rules and endless possibilities, checkers is the kind of game you can play time and time again from childhood through old age.  There’s a reason it’s survived for hundreds of years, and chances are it will survive long after we’re gone.

 

Cribbage: The Classic Card Game

Cribbage is a card game that was invented almost four hundred years ago, but its classic wooden cribbage board is still spotted in countless cafés and parks across the world. Part of the charm of Cribbage comes from its quaint vocabulary describing all of the different moves you can make, such as “one for his nobs” and getting “stuck in the stink hole.” You’ll be sure to love watching the little pegs move along the board as you rack up points and get closer and closer to winning the game.

The Crib

Cribbage is played with a deck of standard playing cards as well as what’s called a cribbage board. Each player gets dealt a hand of six cards, two of which they then discard into a pile in the center of the table called a Crib. Players will then cut one card from the draw pile and turn it face up in between them. This card counts both as part of each player’s hand as well as the Crib.

Players will then go back and forth playing cards to try to make sets and sequences and earn points. Because you don’t know what the turn-up card will be until you’ve already discarded two of your cards to the Crib, you may find yourself parting with cards that you wish you’d held onto.Cribbage is very much a game of cat and mouse, as you’ll have to keep an eye on the cards you think your opponent has if you want a chance of setting a trap for them. 

Pegging Points

Players will keep score of their points by moving pegs along tracks on their cribbage board. Each round goes until both players have used their entire hand of cards. At the end of each round, players will pick up their hand and figure out each scoring combination they can use. Whichever player is designated the dealer that round also gets to use the cards in the Crib to help them earn additional points.

The winner of Cribbage is whichever player is the first to win 121 points. This can influence your decisions each round as to how long you decide to let the round go on for. For example, if you can tell the other player is racking up some serious points, you may want to play the hand tight in order to keep both of your overall scores low.

The cribbage board is one of the most unique elements of the game, as it adds a fun aesthetic component to it. Sure, you could just as easily score the game with a pencil and a sheet of paper, but a cribbage board imbues the card game with a sense of beauty. Moving the little pegs along the board is incredibly satisfying as you see yourself visually take the lead from your opponent.

Cribbage Spinoffs

There are a couple of spinoffs and expansions of Cribbage that make the card game even more complex. Wild: Cribbage Expansion adds a deck of 31 playing cards to the original game that you set beside the crib board. Whenever a player counts a multiple of five, they then get to draw a wild card and follow its instructions. This can lead you to do things re-cut the deck or land you in the stink hole.

Mastermind Ultimate Cribbage is a card game that adds six new types of cards to the original card deck. The rules are similar to the original card game, but the six special cards add new rules that can help or hinder you. For example, the Super Wild is a wild card that can be played as one face value during pegging and used as a different face value during counting.

Peg Your Points and Don’t Forget the Crib With Cribbage

Cribbage is playable by 2-4 players, although it’s typically best suited as a 2-person game. It’s suitable for ages 10 and up, as its mechanics are not too complicated for younger players to learn. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, so it’s the perfect game to play for fun at a coffee shop or in the park.

Dive into the fun of this classic card game and buy Cribbage today!

Go: A Game As Old As Time

Chances are you’ve seen people playing a game of Go in the park or on TV, maneuvering around little black and white stones on a large wooden board. While Go may be one of the simplest games to learn, it offers countless opportunities for developing strategies and tactics to beat your partner and steal their territory out from underneath them. Go gives you the ability to develop your own unique style, providing you with countless of hours of mindbending fun.

The History of Go

Go is one of the oldest board games in history, but its simple rules belay an endless amount of depth. Go was first mentioned in the Analects of Confucious in around 500 BC, while the earliest physical evidence of the board game was a Go board discovered in 1952 in the tomb of the Han Dynasty, which lasted from 206 BC to 9 AD.

There are many urban legends and scholarly anecdotes about the origins of Go, the most popular of which is that it was invented by either Chinese emperors, court astrologers, or an imperial vassal. Many claim that Go was invented by Emperor Yao to amuse his son, while others claim that Emperor Shun created the game to make his son smarter. No matter who invented Go, its popularity and endurance have certainly been well established.

Learning the Rules

Because Go has been around for so long, there are plenty of different variants of the game that come with all sorts of different rules. However, the standard game is usually the same. It starts with an empty board, which is a 17×17 grid. Each player is given a bunch of stones to use, with one player using black stones and the other using white.

The goal of the game is to use your stones to form territories by blocking off empty spaces on the board. Players will take turns placing one stone at a time on the intersections of the lines. Once you’ve placed a stone, you can’t move it. However, you can surround your opponent’s stones and capture them, which allows you to take them prisoner.

The game ends once the board has been filled or when both players agree to end it. At the end of the game, players will tally up the points by collecting one point for every empty space within their territory and one point for each of their opponent’s stones they’ve captured. Like the game of chess, Go requires you to think many steps ahead to anticipate your opponent’s strategy and thwart their plans before they can succeed.

Variants of Go

Go has many different variants that differ in areas such as the scoring method and the placement of handicaps. Tibetan Go begins with six stones from both colors placed on the third line within the grid. The Korean form of Go (called Sunjung baduk) begins with eight stones of each color laid out on the grid in a specific pattern, while Capture Go simplifies the game by declaring the first person to capture a stone the winner.

There’s even a variant of Go called Joker Go that uses a special deck of cards to spice things up. Each player is given a deck of 27 cards that show a unique configuration of stones. Players can then either play a stone normally or draw and play a card, which allows them to place the stones as shown on the card. This can throw a wrench in your plans or your opponent’s plans by reshaping the board in a dramatic way.

Ready, Set, Go

Go is the ultimate 2-person game, as it’s very much a one-on-one game of getting into your opponent’s head. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, as it has incredibly simple rules that can be understood by any player regardless of their level of skill. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, although the game has been known to go on for up to three hours depending on the skill of the players.

Go is an excellent abstract strategy game if you’re looking for something to stimulate your mind. Buy Go today and enjoy the limitless fun of this ancient game!

Jenga: How High Can You Go?

Jenga is one of those party games that never gets old. We all remember the heart-pounding tension of trying to wiggle out that little wooden block without causing the whole tower to topple over. Because Jenga is more focused on physical dexterity than strategy, you’ll be sure to enjoy refining your tower stacking skills with this classic board game that never disappoints.

Building the Tower

Jenga is played with 54 wooden blocks that are each three times as long as they are wide. The blocks are stacked three in a row side by side to form a square, with three blocks then stacked perpendicularly on top of the previous stack. This means that if the bottom row of blocks is facing north and south, then the row above will face east and west (and so on and so forth).

The game begins with one player building the tower by stacking the rows of blocks on top of each other. There are going to be a total of 18 different stories of blocks once the tower is first built, although the number of stories will increase once the game has begun. Jenga usually comes with a loading tray that helps you stack the initial tower, since it would usually be pretty tedious doing it by hand.

One of the trickiest aspects of this party game is that each Jenga block is not created to be identical. Each block has small, random variations that make stacking them more difficult and make the game more challenging.

Deconstructing the Tower

The game is then played in turns as each player takes one block from almost any level of the tower and places it on top of the tower. The only level you’re not allowed to take a block from is either the top incomplete level or the one below it. This means that you’ll have to find certain blocks within the tower that you can safely remove without threatening the integrity of the tower itself.

If you end up knocking over the tower, then you lose the game. You’ll want to move carefully as you remove blocks, as one wrong move can result in a pile of fallen Jenga blocks. Some players find it helpful to tap a block before removing it to make sure that they can get it out without knocking over the tower. However, you must only use one hand at a time to remove blocks from the tower.

After each turn, players are allowed to wait 10 seconds before taking the next turn in order to see whether or not gravity will take its course and knock the tower over. If you remove a block and the tower falls over within 10 seconds, then you lose the game. If the tower falls over in the middle of the other player’s turn after 10 seconds have passed, however, then they lose even if they have yet to touch the tower.

Jenga Sequels

There are a few sequel versions of Jenga that add fun new mechanics to the game and make it a bit more complex. Jenga: Super Mario allows you to play as characters such as Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, or Toad by taking character pegs and slotting them into blocks inside the tower. Players will use a spinner to decide how many layers their character is allowed to climb and how many blocks they have to remove.

There’s also a Monopoly Jenga that combines all of the fun of Jenga with the classic board game Monopoly. This version of Jenga is similar to the block balancing mechanics of the regular party game, but each block represents properties you need to collect and may earn you points or abilities.

Move Gently with Jenga

Jenga is playable by 1-8 players, as it’s just as fun to play by yourself as it is with a small group of friends. It’s suitable for ages 6 and up, so it’s a great party game to play at kid’s parties or with families. Playing time for Jenga lasts around 20 minutes, but you’ll almost certainly want to play multiple rounds.

Buy Jenga today and let the blocks fall where they may!

 

The Game of Life: When Art Truly Does Imitate Life

Life is one of those classic board games that you played with your siblings growing up—it’s packed to the brim with nostalgia and fun memories. But this old board game more than stands the test of time, as recent versions of it have gotten rid of some of the outdated mechanics of the game and added fun new elements. Life allows you to build a life of your own in a matter of minutes, weaving around the board in an effort to make the most of the short time you have before you reach retirement.

Spinning Through Life

The game of Life is meant to mirror one’s actual life, allowing you to do things like choose a career, marry, have children, and buy a home. Unlike real life, where these decisions are made freely, Life forces you to make your choices based on a spinner. Players will advance through the spaces on the game board by spinning a spinner located in the center of the board. 

Some choices give you several options. For example, when you get to the career space, you get to pick several cards to choose from in order to decide which career best fits you. The marriage space, however, is not optional. Players are given a little miniature car to move around the board, adding small pegs to represent a spouse and kids that get added along the way.

Life Tiles

Like real life, one of the biggest goals of the game of Life is to earn as much money as possible by the time you reach retirement. Money is doled out in the form of little pieces of colored paper, which you spend and earn at various points throughout the game. There’s also an option to earn money by buying stocks, which are represented by a number 1-9. Whenever a player spins and lands on that number, you earn money.

Players will collect what are called Life Tiles whenever they land on a space or hit a certain milestone. These tiles can give you money through sudden windfalls such as winning the lottery; or, they can hit you with unforeseen expenses like a midlife crisis or damage to your home. These are some of the most fun and silly elements of the game, as things may be going great for you until botched plastic surgery saddles you with debt!

One of the most interesting things about this board game is that the choices you make may not always be what you would do in real life. Sure, who doesn’t want to own a mansion?  But in Life, drawing the mansion card saddles you with a hefty bill and no discernable benefit, whereas the cheap trailer will do just fine. You’ll also be given the opportunity to purchase insurance, which can save you in the event that you land on a space that burns your house down.

Life Sequels

Life has been out for over 60 years, cementing its place in history as a classic family board game. Since its first release, there have been countless sequel board games with new and interesting variations. The Electronic Banking version of Life makes things slightly easier (and more up to date) by tracking everyone’s funds with a card system instead of using cash.

Life: Twists and Turns has several updates, giving you new choices and possibilities as well as a “LIFEpod” that helps you track time and manage your careers and families. There’s also a Star Wars version of the board game called Life: A Jedi’s Path that forces you to do battle, go on missions, and build your lightsaber as you enhance your connection to the Force. Will you choose the righteous Jedi Path or the tempting Dark Path?

Breeze Your Way Through Life

Life is playable by 2-6 players, which makes it the perfect board game for families of all sizes. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, so it’s a great way to introduce younger players to things like money management. Life has a playing time of around an hour, giving you plenty of time to explore the board and see what fate has in store for your life.

Buy Life today and enjoy the wacky fun of this nostalgic classic!

 

Five Crowns: The Game Isn’t Over ‘Til The Kings Go Wild!

Most card games involve your standard deck of playing cards, but that’s not enough for Five Crowns. This card game goes one step further by adding a fifth suit, throwing even more chaos into the clash of the royals. Five Crowns is played similar to the card game Rummy, although it’s a lot simpler and comes with beautifully designed cards. If you’re looking for a card game that’s fun for the whole family, then Five Crowns is the game for you.

Books, Straights, and Melds

In each hand, your goal is to make a set of cards (which is called a meld). However, the thing that sets this card game apart from Rummy is that the number of cards it takes to make a meld changes each hand. The number of cards you’re allowed to hold each round is equal to the number of cards you need to make a meld.

While on the first hand you need only three cards for your set, the number of cards increases by one each round all the way to thirteen in the last and eleventh hand. In order to make a valid meld, you need either a book or a straight. While a book is three or more cards of the same value, a straight is three or more cards of the same suit in consecutive order.

Throughout each hand, players will draw and discard one card at a time in order to try to make their meld. Once a player has successfully made a meld, the rest of the players have one final turn before the hand ends. Any cards that don’t get used to make a meld work against you, earning you points based on the face value of the card. Whichever player has the lowest score after the end of the eleventh hand wins the overall game.

Wild Cards

One of the twists of Five Crowns is that it comes with a number of wild cards that can help you make your meld. There are two joker cards that can be used however you please in any round. In addition to these joker cards, each round has a different wild card based on the number of cards you hold in your deck during the round. So, for example, the first round requires three cards in a meld, which means that threes are wild.

Another thing that sets Five Crowns apart from Rummy is that Five Crowns comes with an additional fifth suit, which is stars. There’s also no ace or deuce in the deck like you’d find in a normal deck of cards. The beautiful illustration of the cards is definitely one of the most alluring aspects of the game, as they go above and beyond a simple deck of cards you would use to play a game like Rummy.

Five Crowns Spinoffs

Five Crowns comes with several spinoff card games. Five Crowns Junior simplifies the game into only five hands, making it easier for younger players to learn. Instead of scoring points at the end of each hand and adding them up at the end, players will earn a treasure chest for winning each hand. The player with the most treasure chests at the end of the game wins.

Five Crowns Mini Round also simplifies the game by using fewer cards, although its biggest trait is the fact that it comes with tiny cards in a little tin. This makes the card game easy to travel with and play on the go.

Five Crowns: Rummy with a Twist

Five Crowns is playable by 1-7 players, so it’s just as good to play on your own as it is for the whole family. This card game is suitable for ages 8 and up, which makes it a good game to use to teach younger players how to collect sets and manage their hands. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, so you can easily play a game or two on a weeknight or before dinner.

Five Crowns is perfect for fans of Rummy who are looking for something a bit simpler for the kids. Buy Five Crowns today and join the clash of the kings!

 

Mahjong: The Perfect Blend Of Luck, Skill, and Strategy

Mahjong is a game of great fun that requires more than just skill. Players will draw tiles to try to complete matching sets, drawing and discarding them at will until they have a perfect mahjong. While Mahjong is similar to the card game Rummy, its use of traditional Chinese characters,  symbols, and its focus on the directions of the wind elevate it beyond just your average game.

Mahjong goes all the way back to the Qing dynasty in China, but it’s since spread throughout the world. For every country in the world that Mahjong is played in, there is a unique regional variant. But while the rules and scoring methods may differ slightly, Mahjong always relies on the same blend of luck, skill, and strategy to win.

Simples, Honors, and Bonus Tiles

The goal of each round of Mahjong is to get what is called a mahjong, which is when you get four sets of three tiles and one pair of matching tiles. A set of three is called either a “pung,” which is three of the same tile, or a “chow,” which is three consecutive numbers within the same suit. The pair, however, must always be two identical tiles. Because you start the game with a hand of 13 tiles, you must achieve your mahjong by drawing the 14th tile you need to complete your set.

Although different regional versions of the game may vary, Mahjong is normally played with a standard set of 144 tiles or cards. The tiles are split into three separate categories: simples, honors, and bonus tiles. Within the category, there are three different suits that are each numbered from 1 to 9. The simples suits are dots, bamboo, and characters.

The honors tiles have two different suits: winds and dragons. Winds are separated into the four compass directions, while there are three different colors of dragons. Lastly, there are two suits of bonus tiles: flowers and seasons. These have four of each. The bonus tiles are special in that, any time you draw a bonus tile, you don’t add it to your hand, but set it aside to be used to boost your score in the event that you win a hand.

Hands, Rounds, and Matches

The game of Mahjong begins with all the tiles getting placed face down on the table and shuffled. Players will then stack a row of 18 tiles with two tiles in each stack in front of them. They then push the rows together to form a square wall, after which they cut the deck based on the role of a die and each takes their hand of 13 tiles. Players then go around the circle drawing tiles from the wall and discarding their own tiles into the center of the table for other players to draw.

The way that this tile or card game is played is through a number of hands, rounds, and matches. There are at least four hands within each round and four rounds within a match. During each hand, one of the four players gets to take the position of dealer. If the dealer wins their hand, then they get to go again as dealer for an additional hand. Once all four players have taken their turn as dealer, then the round ends.

Explore the Beauty of Mahjong

Mahjong is playable by 3-4 players depending on which rules you’re playing with. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, so it’s an excellent tile or card game to use to teach younger players about strategy. Mahjong has a playing time of around 2 hours, so it’s definitely a special event any time you sit down to play a match with friends.

Because Mahjong requires you to have a bit of luck, many players think that where they sit, how they hold the pieces, and even what they wear can influence the outcome and help them win the game. Whether you’re an experienced Mahjong player or you’re learning it for the first time, you’ll be sure to appreciate the rich and beautiful history of this game. Buy Mahjong today and may the winds blow in your favor!

Scrabble: Word-Lovers Everywhere Unite

Scrabble is one of those board games that you just have to own. Whether you’re an English major who’s about to publish your second novel or you’re someone who hasn’t cracked open a book since high school, you’ll love the classic wordplay that comes with Scrabble. With countless online variations of the game, Scrabble has cemented itself in history as a board game that challenges the mind and will have you reaching for the dictionary.

Collecting the Tiles

Scrabble is played with a checkered game board and little wooden tiles with letters from A – Z. Players draw seven wooden tiles at random from the bag, taking turns by using these tiles to lay down words on the board. In order to determine which player goes first, players will have to each draw a tile at random from the bag. Whoever gets the tile closest to the beginning of the alphabet gets to begin.

In order to earn points in Scrabble, you’ll add up the number of points of each tile you play. Each letter has a certain number of points that you earn when you play it, which usually get higher the more difficult the letter. For example, the ubiquitous E will earn you only one point, while the quixotic Q gets you a whopping 10 points. 

There are also different numbers of each tile in the bag based on how frequently the letter appears in language. You’ll find eight tiles of common vowels such as O, six tiles of consonants like R, but only 1 of the elusive Q. While you may want to collect common letters in order to boost your chances of spelling words with many letters, collecting the more challenging tiles may ultimately earn you a higher score.

Racking Up Points

The key to winning this board game is being able to navigate collecting special bonuses on the board while denying your opponents the opportunity to do the same. The board is set up with individual squares that contain special bonuses such as double word score, triple letter score, and even the rare triple word score. You’ll want to lay down words that make the most of these tiles without setting your opponents up to do the same.

For example, you may find that you can earn a nifty 15 points by spelling out a certain word that uses the double letter space. However, this would leave the next player to then take advantage of the double word space nearby, which would likely blow your score out of the water. Although you can’t see your opponents’ tiles, it pays to keep an eye out on the board to prepare for anything.

Players will pull tiles from the bag to replenish their hand back to seven tiles after each time they play a word. The game ends once all of the tiles have been drawn and the last player plays all seven tiles. Beware of holding on to high-point tiles, however, as any tiles left over in your hand by the end of the game will be deducted from your overall score.

Scrabble Expansions

The basic game of Scrabble is a staple of countless households throughout the world, but there are a few expansions and variations of the board game that switch up the rules. Scrabblers is a board game that comes with double and triple letter tiles that you use to form words. This means that, in addition to single letter tiles, you’ll be using combinations like “BL” or “STE” to make even longer words.

This expansion board game can be used on its own or with the original Scrabble board game. It comes with six different ways to play the game, including a Solitaire mode that can be played alone and a Boardless Crossword mode.

Scrabble: Better Grab the Dictionary!

Scrabble is playable by 2-4 players, so it’s best for small groups or families. It’s suitable for ages 10 and up, so kids can definitely join in on the fun. Playing time lasts around 90 minutes, although it can be shorter if you put a time limit on turns.

Buy Scrabble today and enjoy the mind-bending fun of wordplay!

 

Trouble: The Perfect Children’s Game For Troublemakers

Trouble gets a bad rap for being too simple, but the reality is that this board game is perfectly crafted to teach younger players the fun of board games. Trouble has simple enough game mechanics that players as young as four can take part in the fun without getting tripped up by complicated rules. Plus, players of all ages can agree that nothing is more satisfying than pressing the little plastic Pop-O-Matic in the center of the board and hearing it “pop!”

Pop-O-Matic

Trouble is a roll-and-move game where players are competing to be the first to move all four of their pawns to the end of a circuit. The fun centerpiece of the board game is called a Pop-O-Matic, which is a plastic bubble containing a six-sided die. Instead of manually rolling the die, players will push down on the little bubble to let the Pop-O-Matic roll it for you. This has the added advantage of not only allowing younger players to roll but also making sure you never lose the die.

Trouble uses a board game with a circuit of tracks weaved around the board. Each space has a little peg hole for you to insert your pawn into each time you move forward. Players will begin with each of their pawns at their own unique start space. They’re then given the goal to move all four of their pawns to their own individual finish space located at the corner of the board.

Each turn, a different player will roll the die and move their pawn the number of spaces shown by the die. To start the game and move one of your pawns out of the home space, you’ll need to roll a 6, which then allows you to roll again. When sliding into the finish space, you must roll the exact number of spaces between your pawn and the endzone, which can make it tricky to get all the way there.

Bumped Back To Home

One thing that can throw a wrench in your plans really quickly is when another player lands on your space. When this happens, your pawn gets bumped all the way back to the start. This can make for some bruised feelings among more competitive players, but that’s the risk you take when you’re playing Trouble!

Trouble is best suited for younger players, as there is not much strategy involved in rolling the die. However, you can choose which of your pawns to move forward with each roll, so there is some measure of tactic involved beyond just sheer luck. Still, Trouble is an excellent game to teach younger players about the rules of board games. You can easily use it to work your way up to more complex games as time goes on.

Trouble Sequels

Trouble has a few sequel board games that give the original game a new twist or theme. Trouble: Netflix Super Monsters edition is inspired by the popular Netflix program called “Super Monsters”. Instead of nameless pawns, players can choose to play as their favorite characters from the show such as Katya or Frankie as they make their way across the board.

There’s also a Harry Potter version of Trouble called Harry Potter: Triwizard Maze Game. This version of Trouble adds new Maze cards that make the game a bit more complex. Whenever you land on one of the 10 Draw spaces on the board, you have to draw a card that can either help or hurt you. You may be in luck in that you get to go again, or it may hurt you in that you lose your next turn. Anything’s possible!

Stay Out of Trouble!

Trouble is playable by 2-4 players. It’s a good game for parents to play with their kids or for siblings to play together. It’s suitable for ages 4 and up, so this may be the perfect starter board game to teach little kids about rule-following in board games. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which is usually the perfect amount of time to capture kids’ attention without boring them.

Buy Trouble today and enjoy how good it feels to bounce your opponents back to the start!

Tiddlywinks: The Ultimate Flipping Game

Tiddlywinks has been around for centuries as a popular board game for both young children and serious adults alike. The players with the most dexterity have the upper hand in this board game that’ll have you practicing your flipping skills until the cows come home. Whether you pick up an edition at your local retail store or you attend one of the many Tiddlywinks championships around the world, you’ll sure to love the practical fun of this eclectic board game.

Squidgers and Winks

One of the most delightful aspects of Tiddlywinks is the unique terminology that it uses to describe the various components and actions of the game. The goal of the game is to flip small discs called “winks” into a cup on the center of the board. To do this, players will have to use a larger disc called a “Squidger” or “Tiddledy” to shoot the winks into flight.

Players propel the winks into the air by pressing down on the edge of the wink with the squidger so that the wink pops up into the air. The game is usually played on a large felt mat to help make it easier to flip the winks. While landing your wink into the cup in the center will earn you the most points, some editions of the game allow you to also earn points by landing within a certain target area.

The goal of the board game is to win the most points by the end of the final round. Players have two options to choose a winner. They can either choose to play a set number of rounds, naming the player with the highest points the winner, or they can play to a specific number of points, ending the game whenever one player reaches that score.

Squopping Your Opponent

Unlike many board games, Tiddlywinks is less based on things like strategy and luck and more focused on physical dexterity. The more you play Tiddlywinks, the better you get at flicking the little winks in the right direction. In fact, there are actually a large number of professional organizations and clubs dedicated to the game. Countless people gather together each year to see who can stand out amongst the crowd as the best player.

But you don’t have to be a Tiddlywinks expert to enjoy the fun of engaging in psychological warfare during the game. One of the most diabolical aspects of this board game comes from trying to psych out your opponent as they make their move. All’s fair in Tiddlywinks, as you can feel free to use all of the intimidation tactics you like to distract your opponent and keep them from getting their wink in the cup!

In some version of the game, you have another defensive tool to keep your opponent from getting points called “Squopping.”  This is when you shoot your own winks to land on top of your opponent’s winks. Because only the wink on top gets to be counted in points, this can be a useful way of keeping your opponent’s winks from being counted and advancing your own winks.

Other Versions of Tiddlywinks 

Over the years, many versions of Tiddlywinks had been released with different themes, rules, and mechanics. There’s a Snoopy’s Game of Tiddlywinks that features characters from your favorite comic strip as well as a Tom & Jerry Tiddlywinks that features the eponymous cartoon cat and mouse. Some versions of Tiddlywinks come with a rubberwood circular box that has a hole in the center for you to try and flip the wink into, while others come with a plastic cup or round target playing mat.

Flip Your Wick with Tiddlywinks

Tiddlywinks is playable by anywhere from 1-6 players. You can easily practice flipping the winks into the cup on your own as you refine your skills before playing with a larger group. It’s suitable for ages 4 and up, as even the youngest of players can have fun flipping winks and squopping the other players. Playing time lasts around 10 minutes, although it can go on for longer depending on how many rounds you choose to play.

Practice your flipping skills and buy Tiddlywinks today!

Twister: The Party Game That Will Bring You Closer Than Ever

Twister is a staple at any party, giving you a chance to loosen your tie, pull off your loafers, and get yourself into all sorts of precarious positions.  Unlike many board games in which everyone sits around a table moving pieces around a board, Twister gives you a chance to move your body and enjoy a wacky intertwining of limbs and body parts with your friends and family.  This party game is sure to liven up even the most boring of parties and keep you going round after round.

That Hits the Spot

Twister is played with a large vinyl playing mat lined with colored dots.  Each dot is around 6 inches in diameter, arranged in an array of 6 x 4.  Dots come in the colors of blue, green, red, and yellow, which correspond to the various colors on the spinner.  Each turn, players will have to put one of their hands or feet on a certain color dot on the mat without falling over.

At the beginning of each round, one player is designated the moderator whose role is to spin the spinner, which will land on one of those four colors.  Each player will then have to put either their left hand, right hand, left foot, or right foot on a dot with that color.  While the first few rounds are pretty easy, the game gets progressively harder as players try to reach over one another to place certain body parts on spaces without falling over.

The only way you can take off one of your hands or feet from a certain space is if the spinner tells you to move it to a different color.  However, if the spinner tells you to put your left hand on green (for example) and your left hand is already on green, then you have to move it to a different spot of the same color.  This will force you to move around each turn and make it much more difficult to keep your balance.

Winning Twister

A player gets eliminated when they either lose their balance or touch an elbow or knee to the ground.  The game continues until only one player is left on the mat without having lost their balance.  You can then begin the game again for another round, giving a new person the role of moderator and allowing everyone a chance to join in on the fun.

One of the toughest parts of Twister is that no two players can share the same spot (if you’re playing it with only two players).  This will have you rushing to claim the closest space to you in order to more easily keep your balance.  If you move too slow, you run the risk of losing the space to one of your rivals and being forced to put your body part on a space much further away.

Different Versions of Twister

Twister has been an American classic ever since actress Eva Gabor played it with Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show in 1966.  Since then, there have been many different versions of the game. One of the most intriguing variations of Twister is Blindfolded Twister, which uses four different tactile symbols on the mat.  In this version of the game, players are blindfolded and forced to find the right circle by using their sense of touch.

Don’t Get Spun Out with Twister

Twister is playable by 2-4 players, although one additional player can act as the moderator and switch out in between rounds.  This party game is suitable for ages 6 and up, as the rules are incredibly simple to learn.  Playing time lasts around 10 minutes, but you can keep the game going as long as you like by playing more rounds.

Twister is a classic party game that is great for breaking the ice and putting people in funny and precarious positions.  It’s definitely a game that doesn’t shy away from the physical, so make sure you’re nice and limber before you roll out the Twister mat—otherwise you just might end up losing your balance! Try your best to hold onto your balance and buy Twister today.

 

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