Chess: The Original Game Of War

Chess is the kind of game that separates the men from the boys. While most board games try to ease in newer players as they learn the game, Chess throws you right into the center of the battlefield. Warring kings send their loyal subjects to capture the enemy’s forces and defeat their rivals in this classic yet enduring board game. The opportunity for endless strategies and maneuvers makes Chess the kind of game where no two plays are alike.

Moving the Pieces

As difficult as Chess is to master, it’s incredibly simple to learn. Each piece on the board has its own unique movement that it can use to traverse the board and capture your opponent’s pieces. While the pawns can only move forward one space (or two spaces on the first move), they can only attack diagonally. Bishops can move an unlimited number of diagonal spaces, while rooks can move an unlimited number of spaces left and right.

The knight can move in an L-shape of three spaces forward and then two spaces perpendicular, although you can aim the direction of their movement either forward, to the back, or to the side. The queen is the most powerful piece on the board, capable of moving an unlimited number of spaces in any one direction.

However, the whole game is centered around the king. Although the king can only move one space in any direction, he must be protected at all costs. If another player captures your king, it’s game over. Players typically call out “check” when they’re one move away from capturing their opponent’s king, and “checkmate” when victory is certain.

Chess Strategies

Chess is notable in that there are a number of popular strategies that you can employ to win the game. While new players can certainly play without a strategy, you’ll need to think several steps ahead in order to beat a more advanced player. There have been countless books devoted to chess strategies, laying out classic defensive and offensive strategies for opening the game and capturing your opponent’s king.

Chess is also played in championships all over the world, pitting players of various ranks against each other in an effort to win titles, fame, and fortune. However, you don’t have to be a Grandmaster to enjoy the thrill of Chess. This board game can be enjoyed just as easily by two friends in the park as it can by two masters in a heated championship.

Chess Spinoffs

There are countless spinoffs of Chess that add new elements to the game in order to make it even more chaotic and fun. Code Geass: Knightmare Chess uses two decks of cards in addition to a chessboard that allow you to bend the rules of the game with special abilities. Players will play a standard game of Chess while also drawing and playing cards from the deck, giving you increased opportunities to thwart your opponent and get the upper hand.

Devil’s Chess is another spinoff card game that adds a deck of cards to your typical chessboard. It’s marketed as bringing Chess out of the 6th century and into the 21st by adding modern-day mechanics to this classic game. Players will draw playable cards throughout the game as well as Rule cards, which add special conditions that can mess up your game. It also adds new conditions for winning that can allow you to sneak a victory without taking your opponent’s king.

Take a Dive Into the Classic World of Chess

Chess is a 2-person game, pitting the minds of two players against each other in an incredibly intimate and competitive setting. It’s suitable for ages 6 and up, as younger players can easily understand the mechanics. In fact, younger players are often the ones who become the most adept at the game as they quickly learn new strategies and develop into Chess prodigies.

The playing time for Chess really depends on the expertise of the people playing the game. It can end within minutes if you make a sudden wrong move, but it’s also been known to go on for hours with more advanced players. Buy Chess today and put your mind to the ultimate test!

 

Battleship: A Classic Guessing Game for the Ages

Battleship is a board game that goes back almost 100 years, combining the classic strategy of a guessing game with a nautical war theme. Battleship is as simple as a guessing game can get, but the nostalgia of sinking red pegs into little plastic battleships is something that will never get old. If you’re looking for a simple board game to teach kids about strategy, Battleship is a timeless classic.

The History of Battleship

Although you probably grew up playing Battleship with the little red pegs and plastic ships, the game was originally played using pencil and paper. Battleship dates all the way back to World War I, using paper lined with ruled grids to represent the different spaces on the board. Players would shade in the spaces that represented the battleships and mark an X off of every space that their opponent guessed.

The first commercial version of the game was known as Salvo, which was released in 1931. Then, in 1967, Milton Bradley introduced the version of Battleship that we know today that uses plastic boards and pegs. Since then, Battleship has been released in countless forms, online, and even in the form of a feature film.

Hit or Miss

Battleship is a strategic guessing game played on four grids. Each player gets two grids: one to secretly arrange their own battleships on and one to use for guessing where their opponent’s battleships are. There are five ships, each of which takes up a different number of spaces ranging from 2-5. Players will use little red pegs to mark their guesses, inserting them into the holes on the grid that correspond to their guess.

The grid is set up with letters denoting each column and numbers denoting each row. When you make your guess, you’ll call out the number and letter of the location on the grid. For example, A1 is the uppermost left spot on the grid. If you’ve successfully hit your opponent’s battleship, they’ll call out “Hit!”  If you land in the water, however, then they’ll call out “Miss!”

Battleship is a good mix of luck and strategy. In the beginning, you’ll be shooting in the dark. But as it goes on, you’ll start to get a clearer picture of the board. If you suddenly hit a battleship, you have no way of knowing in which direction the rest of the battleship goes. However, once you’ve successfully hit each section of the battleship, your opponent will call out the signature phrase, “You sunk my battleship!”

Salvo Variant

Battleship usually goes back and forth between players, giving each player one guess at a time to sink the other person’s battleship. There is an optional rule called the Salvo variant, which allows players to call multiple shots depending on how many battleships the player has left. 

This means that if you have yet to sink a battleship, you get five guesses, but if your opponent only has one battleship left, then you only get one guess each round. This can make the game go much more quickly while also allowing slower players an opportunity to catch up to their opponents.

Battleship Sequels

There are countless reinventions of the game Battleship that employ different themes and rules to add a spin on the original. Battleship: Pirates of the Caribbean uses characters and ships from the beloved Disney movie to add a fun pirate theme to this old war-time board game. 

Battleship: Star Wars Advance Mission puts a Star Wars twist on this classic board game, shooting you into outer space and offering you special “one-hit” blows that destroy the entire spaceship in one go. There’s even an active version of the board game Battleship called Battleship Shots that requires you to toss balls onto the other person’s side of the divider in order to sink their ships.

You Sunk My Battleship!

Battleship is a two-person game, so it’s perfect for parents to play with their kids. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, so siblings can play it with each other as well. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, which is perfect for holding younger players’ attention. Buy Battleship today and enjoy the feeling of triumph that comes with hearing the words, “You sunk my battleship!”

 

Sorry! Is Parchisi with a Wicked Twist

Sorry! is one of those board games we all grew up playing as little kids. But like most classic board games, its popularity has endured because of its ability to be played over and over again without losing its shine. Sorry! is a primarily luck-based game that is simple enough for the youngest of kids to understand and enjoy. However, there are several ways to make the game more complex for adults to enjoy it even more with or without the kids.

Following the Path

The goal of the game Sorry! is to move the four pieces of your color from their starting circle to the end of their path along the board. Each player starts with four pieces of a certain color on their starting space. To get one of your tokens out of your home space, you have to draw a card with either a 1 or a 2 on it. Players will go in turns drawing cards and moving their tokens.

One of the twists of Sorry! is that many of these cards allow you to do more than just mindlessly move your token forward. You can often move your piece either forwards or backwards when you pull the “backward 4” card, which gives you greater control over making use of those helpful slides.

Certain areas of the board contain slides, which allow you to skip past many spaces and jettison your token closer to the end. If your token lands on one of these slides at the end of your movement, then you can travel down the slide to the next available spot. You can only travel down slides that aren’t of the same color as your token, however. And if there’s another player sitting on one of those slides when you take your ride, you get to boot them back to the start.

Say You’re Sorry

The most diabolical part of the game Sorry! is also where it gets its namesake from. While you’re not allowed to block other players’ pieces from passing yours, you are allowed to interfere with them on certain occasions. If you end your turn on the same space as another player, you can say “Sorry!” and send their piece all the way back to the start space.

You can also do the same when you pull the special Sorry! card, which allows you to jump your piece to the spot of one of your opponents and kick them back to the start. This makes the game much more competitive while also giving players who are falling behind the opportunity to get ahead.

Sorry Spinoffs

Sorry! has released many spinoff games throughout the years to make the original game a bit more challenging. Simon Sorry! combines Sorry! with the beloved game Simon Says to create one unique board game. Players will use an electronic game unit that lights up in a specific pattern, which they will then try to repeat. If they get it correct, then the unit will tell them how many spaces they can move across the board.

Sorry! Not Sorry! is an adult party version of the original board game that allows you more opportunity to sabotage your friends. Not only can you steal their pawns, but you can also use the “Not Sorry!” cards to force them to expose their wildest secrets.

Sorry! It’s All In Good Fun

Sorry! is playable by 2-4 players, so it’s definitely better for smaller families. It’s also suitable for ages 6 and up thanks to its simple gameplay and easy setup. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, which is short enough to hold younger players’ attention. Sorry! is the perfect game for introducing young kids to board games.

Sorry! can also be made more complex for older players by adding a bit of strategy to the game. While pulling one card at a time means you’re depending on luck to help you win, pulling five cards at a time gives you more control over fate. Adults who want to make the game a little harder can make this change to incorporate strategy into the game by deciding which card to play.

Buy Sorry! today and you won’t be sorry!

 

Candy Land: A Sweet Bite Of Nostalgia

If you grew up playing only one board game as a child, chances are it was Candy Land. Who doesn’t remember the sweetness of Gramma Nutt or wanting to take a bite out of the Candycane Forest? One thing that sets Candy Land apart from other board games is its beautiful simplicity. You don’t need to remember complex sets of rules or even devise a winning strategy to play the game. All you need to do is pick a card and let the chocolate chips fall where they may. After over 70 years on the market, Candy Land’s sweetness has endured, teaching millions of children the joy of board games at a young age.

The History of Candy Land

Although countless families have their own personal history growing up playing Candy Land, the history of the game is quite a tale in and of itself. It was first created by a woman named Eleanor Abbott in the early 1940’s while she was recovering from polio. She made it to entertain other kids who were also recovering from polio in the same ward that she was. Once the game was created, the children suggested that she submit it to the Milton Bradley Company (which was later purchased by Hasbro). Candy Land became their best selling game, and the rest is history.  

The Path to King Kandy

The gameplay of Candy Land is deliciously simple enough for even the smallest of kids to follow. Players race each other down a rainbow-colored path to see who will be the first to arrive at Candy Castle and locate the missing King Kandy. The path to the castle is strewn with sweet and scrumptious locations, from the sticky Molasses Swamp to the icy Peppermint Forest. Just make sure to avoid that villainous Lord Licorice, who rules the Licorice Castle and lords over Candy Land with his sickly sweet power!

Candy Land is played in turns, where each player gets to draw a card with one of six colors on it. These colors represent spaces on the board, and each time you draw a card with a specific color on it, you move to the next space of that color. Players get to handle little character markers like the Gingerbread Man that they navigate around the board on their quest to the finish line.

Some cards will have the name of a specific location on the board, in which case the player who drew that card will have to move their piece to that location. This can cost you the game if you’re within a stone’s throw of the castle and you get sent back to the Gingerbread Plum Trees! The 2006 version of the game created licorice spaces that cause you to lose your turn, while the 2013 version swapped the cards for a spinner that decides which space you move to.

Future Versions of Candy Land

Candy Land has released countless later editions in the last 70 years that make the game slightly more complex or give the board game some of your favorite fictional characters. Candy Land: Fun on the Run turns the board game into a travel board game, allowing kids to play it in the car or on vacation. There are also editions such as Candy Land: Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory or Candy Land: Dora the Explorer that replace characters and locations with elements from other stories.

Take a Ride Down Candy Road with Candy Land

Candy Land is playable by 2-4 players, so it’s easy for parents to play with their kids or for kids to play together. It’s also suitable for ages 3 and up, which is perfect for teaching younger kids the rules of board games. In fact, Candy Land is often used as a tool to help younger players learn things like following rules, socializing, recognizing colors, and using patience.  

Candy Land has a playing time of around 30 minutes, which is just enough time to keep kids’ interest without boring them. With bright colors, inventive characters, and simplistic gameplay, Candy Land is the quintessential board game for youngsters. Buy this game today and enjoy the sweetness of Candy Land!

 

Clue: The Original Whodunit

Clue is one of the most classic whodunit board games. First released back in 1949, this detective board game has made its way into pop culture with countless references, spinoff editions, and even a film. Clue combines dice rolling, memory, and deductive reasoning to create a sleuthing game unparalleled by any other. By emphasizing the skills of deduction and reveling in the ambiance of the classic murder mystery, Clue remains one of the most alluring board games of all time.

Who, What, And Where?

The Clue playing board is set up as the layout of Mr. Boddy’s mansion. Sadly, Mr. Boddy has just been murdered, and the players of the game have to figure out who did it. Not only that, but they also have to figure out what the murder weapon was and in which room it took place! The first person to accurately guess all three wins the game. 

There are six suspects, each of which is controlled by one of the players. Was it the alluring Miss Scarlet or the dignified Colonel Mustard? Only time will tell. There are also six weapons, each of which could be the murder weapon. That gun looks awfully suspect, but the candlestick can be just as deadly in the wrong hands.

The little weapon pieces are some of the coolest elements of the game, as the game includes miniature replicas of the different objects. From the deadly gun to the bright yellow plastic rope, these pieces are part of the nostalgic fun that makes Clue such a memorable game. The suspect pieces are also quite clever, as each of them comes in a bright color corresponding to the name of the suspect, i.e. General White.

Opening the Envelope

Each player gets their own detective notebook that they use to eliminate suspects, weapons, and rooms one by one. The game proceeds with each player placing their suspect on the board on their start places with the weapons randomly placed in different rooms. The suspect, weapon, and room cards are separated into their own decks and shuffled, while one of each gets placed into a yellow envelope to be opened at the end of the game.

Players will roll the die each turn, moving their suspect around the board until they enter a room. Each time the player enters a room, they can announce who they think the killer is and what the weapon is. If one of the players has a card that disproves their theory, then they show the card to the player for them to cross off. 

Players also have the ability to make a formal accusation, which is a one-time deal. After they’ve made their accusation, they check the yellow envelope to see if they’re right. And if they’re wrong? Well, then they’re out of the game! It pays to be cautious when making your accusation lest you be too foolhardy and get eliminated before you’ve got all of the facts straight. The best sleuths know how to bide their time.

Clue: Later Editions

There are too many later editions of Clue to even count. Clue Master Detective, released in 1988, includes twelve possible murder locations, including outdoor locations and secret passages. It also adds a few extra weapons and suspects to make the game even harder for our amateur sleuths. Clue has also released editions based on countless films and TV shows including Doctor Who, Game of Thrones, Downtown Abbey, and even the Horror film It. If you love the nostalgia of classic Clue but you’re looking for something a little more up to date, you’ll love one of these modern editions of the game.

Follow The Clues and Make Your Guess

Clue is playable by 2-6 players, so it’s the perfect game for a family game night or a retro party. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, which means that younger players will be able to guess right alongside the adults. The playing time for Clue is around 45 minutes. This gives you enough time to delve into the world without losing track of the clues or growing tired of the mystery. No board game collection is complete without the classic detective game Clue.

Now… The real question is… Will you buy the game? I think I have a clue. I think you will.

 

Relive The Classics And Remember The House Rules With Monopoly

If you grew up playing board games, chances are you own a copy of Monopoly. The colored money, ruthless landlords, and “Go to Jail” cards are a fixture of almost every household. But Monopoly has proven to be a lasting and wildly popular game for a reason, as it requires a great deal of strategy and negotiation to win the game and run everyone else off the board. Anyone looking to relive the classics will love the nostalgia of Monopoly, as well as the flexibility of its rules.

Rolling the Dice

During each turn of Monopoly, a player will roll two die and then move that number of spaces around the board. Each space either represents a property or forces you to draw a card. These cards can require you to do anything from pay taxes, collect income, or go straight to jail.

If you land on an unowned piece of property, you can either buy it or you can allow the bank to auction it out to the highest bidder. Buying property allows you to charge rent to anyone who lands on that space in the future, supplementing your income and helping you bankrupt the other players.

If you land on a piece of property owned by another player, you have to pay them rent. Once a player has collected all the spaces in a certain color group, they can build houses and hotels to charge players higher rent and bankrupt them even faster.

Going To Jail

Players can be sent to jail for several reasons. One reason is by landing on the “Go to Jail” space. Drawing a “Go to Jail” card is another. When rolling the dice, rolling doubles allows you to roll again immediately after. If you roll doubles three times in a row, however, you get “caught speeding” and are sent to the brig.

Landing in jail moves you to the Jail space and ends your turn. The only way to get out of jail is to pay a fine of $50, use a “Get Out of Jail Free” card, or successfully roll doubles on the dice. While jail isn’t the end of the road, it can be an unwelcome wrench in the works that can derail real estate transactions and push you closer to bankruptcy.

House Rules

Monopoly has been around for so many years and has been played by so many people that players have developed their own house rules to make the game either easier or more complex. The “Free Parking jackpot rule” gives each player the opportunity to win a bundle of cash just for landing on the Free Parking space, which can make the game last even longer. Whether you’re new to Monopoly or you’ve been playing the game since childhood, house rules can keep the game feeling fresh and upend strategies left and right.

Monopoly Expansions

Monopoly has seen several expansions that can either be played as stand-alone games or combined with the base game for additional fun. The Get Out of Jail mini-game gives you an additional way to escape prison by using a spade to flick out colored prisoners. Free Parking is another fun add-on that gives you the optional Taxi Challenge, allowing you to move anywhere you want on the board if you win.

Monopoly: The Landlord’s Game

Monopoly is the ultimate family game, playable by 2-8 players. Whether you’re an only child or you’re playing with extended family, Monopoly can accommodate families of all sizes. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, so younger children can easily get involved and keep up with the adults.

Playing time lasts between one to three hours, although certain house rules have been known to keep the game going all night. Monopoly isn’t the kind of game that you can cram a quick round in between the appetizers and the main course. If you’re playing Monopoly, it’s going to be an experience all of its own. The best part of the game is that, with so many different house rules that you can bring to it, you will rarely ever play the same game of Monopoly twice!

Now it’s time to go out and make your fortune!

 

 

Only Logic Can Crack The Code With Mastermind

Do you love using your skills of deduction to crack codes and solve puzzles? If so, you’ll love Mastermind, a code-breaking game developed by Israeli telecommunications expert and postmaster Mordecai Meirowitz. Meirowitz invented the game Mastermind based off of the pencil and paper game called Bulls and Cows, putting a unique spin on it and swapping out the pencil and paper for colorful plastic pieces. Mastermind is a game of logic and deduction, where players must alternately make and break codes in an attempt to prove who’s the true mastermind.

Codemaker Vs. Codebreaker

In this two-player game, each round will have one player taking on the role of codemaker while the other becomes the codebreaker. The codemaker must secretly place four different colored pegs behind a secret screen on the game board, while the codebreaker is allowed to make several guesses as to which pegs are located where. The codemaker wins points for every guess the codebreaker makes until they either crack the code or run out of turns.

Winning a round requires more than just a lucky guess, however. Codebreakers will have to build upon the information gleaned from their previous guesses in order to figure out the right combination of colored pegs. Every time the codebreaker makes a guess, the codemaker will give them feedback as to which part of their guess is correct. You may have all the right pegs in all the right places, but are they all the right color, too? Only the smartest brain can crack the code fast enough to win the game.

Pieces Of The Game

Mastermind was inspired from the paper and pencil game Bulls and Crows, but the cool little game pieces are what make it truly a standout game. Players will use a cutely designed decoding board to make their guesses, which is set up with cool little rows to place the pegs and view previous guesses. The hidden compartment visible only to the codemaker is a neat little addition that adds to the secrecy of the game.

The colored pegs are also fun to play with, as they make quite a colorful sight when you arrange them across the board. The code pegs come in six different bright colors with round heads, while the smaller key pegs come in black and white with flat heads. One of the most unique elements of Mastermind is that, since you communicate solely through pegs, you don’t even need to speak the same language to play the game!

Mastermind Variations

Mastermind was released in 1972, and since then there have been several different variations that expand upon the simple peg-based game. Royale Mastermind reduces the amount of holes per row to only three instead of four, but adds five differently shaped pegs to make the game even more advanced. Mastermind44 also expands upon the initial game by allowing four players to enjoy it instead of two players.

Word Mastermind combines the logical deduction of Mastermind with the wordplay of Scrabble by forcing you to come up with four letter words for the other player to guess. There’s even a Walt Disney Mastermind that uses your favorite beloved Disney characters instead of colors!

Mastermind: Some Codes Were Made To Be Broken

Mastermind is a two-player game, although the 20-minute playing time means that you can easily pass it around and give everyone a chance to play. Players will decide how many rounds they want to play in advance, so the game really can last as short or as long as you want it to. Mastermind is also suitable for ages 8 and up, so if you’re looking for a game that allows kids to play around with the concept of logic and deduction, Mastermind is the perfect introduction.

Mastermind is a simple game with a very simple premise, although the competitive nature of the game can make for some pretty high stakes. There’s nothing like pulling out the decoding board and lining up the pegs to settle a score on who’s got the higher IQ. If a battle of the minds sounds like your idea of a good time, Mastermind is the game for you!

Set your code and let’s get cracking!

 

Dominoes: One Set, Countless Games

Almost every culture around the world has its own version of dominoes. Whether you’re playing with European-style ivory pieces or a cheap plastic set from the gas station, dominoes is one of the most flexible and popular games of all time. The versatility of these well-known tiles means that you’ll never run out of different variations to try, and they’re small enough to travel with you anywhere in the world.

History Of Dominoes

Dominoes were first mentioned during the Song dynasty in China sometime in the 13th century, although modern dominoes didn’t first appear until the 18th century in Italy. Dominos were most likely named after the black and white hooded costumes worn during the Venetian Carnival, which makes sense due to the black and white coloring of the tiles.

Domino tiles are twice as long as they are wide, usually with a line in the middle dividing them into two. Dominoes are also marked on either side with a certain number of spots, usually anywhere between zero to six. A basic set of dominoes is called a double six set, and comes with 28 tiles, although larger sets are available for more intricate domino games.

Crafting The Domino

The novelty of dominoes comes from the different materials historically used to make the tiles. Dominoes can be made from ivory, stone, metal, or even blown glass or crystal. If you’ve ever picked up a traditional pack of dominoes, however, they’re most likely made of synthetic plastics. For as many different dominoes there are in the world, there are just as many kinds of games that you can play using these versatile tiles.

Blocking Games Vs. Scoring Games

Domino games usually fall into one of two categories: blocking games and scoring games. Blocking games require you to get rid of the tiles in your hand while stopping your opponent from emptying their own hand. Draw dominoes is the most classic blocking game, which involves two players each drawing seven tiles at random to play. Players will then lay their tiles down in a line, matching the number of spots on the ends of tiles with the next tile played.

By the end of the blocking game, the winner is the person who’s gotten rid of all of their tiles. If the game ends with neither player able to get rid of all of their tiles, then the winner is the person with the fewest tiles in their hand.

Scoring games will earn players points for making specific moves, but usually follow some variation of the standard Draw game. While Draw dominoes is the most simple domino game, there are infinitely more variations that make dominoes that much more intricate. Block dominoes allows you to pass your turn if you don’t have a playable tile, which lets you play with up to four players at once in a much more cut-throat game.

Fives Family

The Fives Family is a series of traditional dominoes games that requires you to make the ends of the tiles match up to a multiple of five in order to score. This allows for a much more natural flow, as you can make way more connections and earn points in sneakier ways. Five-up is one of the most popular Fives Family domino games, introducing the concept of “spinners” that split the game board into four different sides.

Laying Down The Line With Dominoes

Dominoes are some of the most versatile playing pieces in the world, allowing you to play countless games that are as simple or as complex as you like. Whether you’re playing a one-on-one draw game or playing Five-up with 10 players, you can easily bust out a set of dominoes for a quick game. Playing time also depends on the type of domino game you play, although it usually lasts around 30 minutes.

Dominoes are also suitable for ages 5 and up, so simple versions of the game can help younger kids adjust to the rules before moving on to more advanced rules. When it comes to dominoes, it doesn’t matter how old you are or where you live—everyone can enjoy the abstract strategy of these chunky little tiles!

Make time for some fun today!

 

Qwirkle: Find the Pattern and Lay Down the Line

Qwirkle is an abstract tile-playing game that takes the concept of Scrabble and turns it on its head.  Instead of forcing you to spell out difficult words with tiles that will send your friends and family scrambling to the dictionary, Qwirkle is played with tiles bearing colorful shapes that you have to arrange in a line.  No game board is required with this simple and creative game—all you need is a flat surface and a yearning for a little competition.

High Quality Wooden Game Pieces

As opposed to the bland little brown tile pieces you use in Scrabble, Qwirkle comes with 108 shiny black tiles featuring colorful patterns in various intricate shapes.  The delightful game pieces are often one of the most memorable parts of any board game, and Qwirkle delivers in spades.  From the whimsical clover to the dynamic eight-point star, Qwirkle’s quirky tiles will be sure to build a beautiful pattern by the end of the game.  

Laying The Tiles

Gameplay begins with mixing all of the tiles in the bag and having each player draw 6 tiles at random.  Every turn, each player will place one or more tiles on the table to form a row.  The rows need to each share one attribute of either color or shape, but not both.  For example, one row can consist of clover tiles in different colors, while a different row may be each of the shapes in the color red.

Unlike Scrabble, which forces you to play with the tiles you’ve got before drawing new ones, Qwirkle allows you to spend your turn exchanging the tiles in your hand for new ones.  This can end up making the game way more dynamic instead of saddling you with a dud hand for the rest of the game.

Scoring Points

Every time you place a tile in a line, you score one point for each tile within that line.  If you complete the line with the sixth and final tile, congratulations!  You win a 6-point bonus that can jettison you into the lead.  An additional 6-point bonus is given to the first person to play all of their tiles once the bag has run out, which is just enough of a boost to keep things competitive until the very last second.

Qwirkle is simple to learn, but definitely gives plenty of opportunity to employ strategy.  Blocking other people from continuing a pattern can be just as effective as plotting out your own high score combination.  However, the luck-based element of the game will throw a wrench into even the most carefully laid plans.  This combination of luck and strategy will keep you coming back to Qwirkle time and time again.

Fun For Families And Non-Gamers

Qwirkle is the perfect game for families and kids of all ages.  It’s an excellent game to use to teach younger children about concepts like shape and color matching and counting, while older kids can learn concepts like strategy and planning.  Suitable for ages 6 and up, Qwirkle is incredibly easy to learn and will having you playing like an expert within minutes.  But just because it’s so simple doesn’t mean that it’s boring—Qwirkle leaves plenty of room for more advanced players to play the long game while novices can enjoy it at the basic level.

Qwirkle is also much more accessible to non-gamers than hardcore games like Catan.  Because the rules are so simple, even people who don’t normally enjoy board games can find themselves drawn in for a 30-40 minute game.  This dynamic game can join together serious and casual gamers, serving as a gateway game towards more advanced board games.

Walk The Line With Qwirkle

Qwirkle is a simple game with an abstract concept that can appeal to a wide variety of gamers.  Its accessibility is where it truly shines, even if that removes a little bit of the complexity of the game for people who are looking for something with a greater challenge.  Still, if you’re a visual gamer who likes building intricate patterns and playing with beautiful wooden game pieces, you’ll love the quality that Qwirkle has to offer.

Risk: The Ultimate Game in World Domination

Arguably one of the most popular board games of all time, Risk deals with one simple mission: world domination.  In the world of Risk you’ll control territories, attack other players, and move your armies all around a giant game board representing a map of the planet Earth.  With complex strategies, shifting alliances, and a lengthy game time, Risk is the ultimate board game for the most hardcore gamers.

Troops, Territories, And Missions

Risk is set up with a large tabletop board showing a political map of the world.  The six continents are divided into 42 territories on which players will deploy their armies and fight for occupation.  Each player gets a set of colored tokens that represent their troops, while players collect territory and mission cards to aid them in their mission of world domination.  There are many elements to keep track of in Risk, but the rules are relatively simple.  Hardcore gamers will definitely love the complex level of strategy that comes with the game.

Rolling The Dice

Each turn gives you an opportunity for conquering new territories.  Whether you choose to attack, move your army, or pass, you’ll have to have all of your wits about you to avoid losing your last territory and facing elimination from the game.  Attacking involves the element of luck, as your success depends on how high you roll the dice.  You can attack as often as you want, and you’ll win bonus cards for every enemy territory you successfully take.

Allies Vs. Enemies

Strategy is the key element when it comes to playing Risk, as you cannot win without being able to think three steps ahead.  Defend your territories by building up your border armies, but watch out—your enemies may be doing the same in order to launch an attack.  If you gain control of an entire continent, you win bonus reinforcement armies that push you one step closer to taking over the world.

Alliances are a common optional element of Risk that can make gameplay even more intriguing.  Because there are no official rules regarding alliances, players can stab their allies in the back at any time.  Your loyalty depends on your long-term strategy, as only you can decide whether or not an alliance will work to your advantage.  Many a friendship has been ended over a Risk alliance gone wrong, but ruthlessness is the key to winning the game!

Variations of Risk

Risk was released in 1959, so there have been countless later editions released over the years that put a new spin on the game.  Castle Risk was the first variation, narrowing the game down to feuding castles in ancient Europe.  Risk: 2210 A.D. went in the opposite direction of time, launching players into a futuristic war fighting over moon and ocean territories in addition to dry land.

For the elf-lover in all of us, Risk: the Lord of the Rings sets the battle in northern Middle-earth.  This variation features beloved characters such as hobbits and orcs fighting it out in a magical arena.  From popular video games such as Assassin’s Creed to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there’s no shortage of Risk variations that will put a fun and unique spin on this classic game.

Conquer The World At Your Own Risk

Risk is definitely one of the more complex games out there, although it is still suitable for ages 10 and up.  You may want to work younger kids up to playing Risk by starting with simpler games to help them develop concepts like strategy.  Still, Risk is an integral component of any game collection that can easily fill an entire game night.  Game time usually lasts around 2 hours, but games of Risk have been known to go on for days depending on the amount of players.

If you love games that feature multiple players and require you to build innovative strategies, you’ll love Risk.  There’s a reason that it has been able to maintain its popularity over the last 60 years, as its simple premise and potential for complex interactions can appeal to everyone.  Consider adding Risk to your arsenal and experience the thrill of conquering the world!

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