Can You Save The Kittens In A Blender? 

Every once in a while a board game comes along that’s so twisted and so adorable that you can’t help but take notice. Kittens In A Blender puts a diabolical twist on your favorite furry friends by putting them in danger of being turned into a fluffy smoothie! You’ll have to act fast and make some hard choices if you want to save your kittens and win the game. Kittens In A Blender is a delightfully wicked board game with dynamic gameplay and buckets of laughs.

The Blender, the Box, and the Counter

Kittens In A Blender has several places for the kitties to roam in the kitchen. The first is the deadly Blender, which is represented by the game box top with an oversized Blender card inside. This is the place you want to avoid allowing your kittens to enter, as all of the kittens that are playing in the Blender when the Blend card is played will be destroyed!

The next location is the Box, which is represented by the base of the game box with an oversized Box card inside it. This space is safe for kittens to play in. Whenever a Blend card is played, all of the kittens playing inside the Box will be saved, living to meow another day. Saved kittens earn you two points each at the end of the game, so getting your kittens inside the Box is a major goal of the board game.

The last location is the Counter, which is represented by a space in between the Blender and the Box. When a Blend card is played, all of the kittens on the Counter will be moved to the Blender. There is a way for a player to stop the Blender from destroying the kittens, however. By playing a Pulse card, a player can counter a Blend card and stop the bloodshed from occurring.

Moving the Kittens Around

In Kittens In A Blender, each player is assigned a Kitten color at the beginning of the game, which is either red, green, blue, or yellow. The deck is then shuffled, and each player is dealt six cards with which to play. Players will then take turns playing two cards each round, drawing back up to six after they play. If they choose to play a Kitten card, they’ll play it directly into either the Blender, the Counter, or the Box.

Other cards will be played face up in front of the player, giving everyone a chance to see the cards being played. The non-Kitten cards will either be the deadly Blend card or cards that will move the kittens around. Kittens on the Move will move kittens around the board wherever you choose, while Kittens in the Blender will move all of the kittens from either the Counter or the Box directly to the Blender.

There’s also a fun wild card called Dog’s in the Kitchen, which forces each player to give their hand to whichever player is indicated by the direction on the card. Once all 16 of the Blend cards have been played, players tally up points to see who wins. Saved kittens earn you two points each, while blended kittens will cost you one point each.

Kittens In a Blender Expansion

Kittens In A Blender comes with an expansion pack called More Kittens In A Blender that adds 32 unique kittens to the game. These kittens come in two different colors, allowing you to play the game with up to six players. This expansion to the board game also adds Flavors such as Vanilla Extract or Strawberries to the mix that can help you make a delicious smoothie out of your blended kittens and earn extra points. How diabolical!

Kittens In a Blender: Save the Kitties!

Kittens In A Blender is playable by 2-4 players, although the expansion allows up to six. This board game is suitable for ages 8 and up, as the mechanics are easy to follow even if the humor is a little much for young children. Playing time lasts around 20-40 minutes, so it’s a great icebreaker board game.

Save the adorable little kitties and buy Kittens In A Blender today!

 

Killer Bunnies: It’s a Battle of Bunnies

What’s more cute and cuddly than an adorable little bunny? If you’re asking that question, chances are you’ve already lost the game! In Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, you’ll learn that bunnies can be more vicious than meets the eye. This cutthroat card game forces you to collect weapons and build an army of lethal bunnies to wipe out the competition and collect the elusive Magic Carrot. Do you have what it takes to engage in bunny warfare?

Finding the Magic Carrot

The object of Killer Bunnies is to collect as many Carrots as possible in an effort to find the Magic Carrot. However, you’ll have to make sure you have at least one surviving bunny by the end of the game in order to win. You’ll have to balance collecting Carrots with fighting off the other bunnies if you want to make it through the bunny carnage alive.

Killer Bunnies uses a few decks of cards, including a large Carrot deck, a small Carrot deck, and a third deck that players will draw from throughout the game. These cards will include bunnies of different colors and types, Weapons, and draw Carrot cards. There are also cards that have special effects like Heavenly Halo or Bunny Abducting Aliens that add a nice bit of humor to the game.

There are a few ways you can earn extra moves on your turn. By playing a certain combination of bunnies or drawing certain cards, you can leap ahead of the competition and upend your opponent’s strategy.

The card game ends once the last of the large Carrot cards is picked up. Then, the Magic Carrot is determined by whichever player has the large Carrot card that matches the card on the bottom of the small Carrot deck. This means that the winner is chosen randomly, but that the more Carrots you collect, the more likely you are to win.

Defending Your Bunnies

While the overall objective of Killer Bunnies is to collect Carrot cards and find the Magic Carrot, the main gameplay involves waging war with your bunnies. You play your bunnies by placing them within the Bunny Circle, waging war against the other bunnies on the board. You’ll need to buy, trade, and negotiate with the other players if you want to make it through long enough to see the end of the game.

Most of the cards must be played in the Rabbit Run, which holds two cards at a time. This means that cards will take two turns to actually get into play, giving you a chance to plan ahead and guess which cards your opponents currently have on the docket. However, some cards are either Special or Very Special, which means you can play them right out of your hand. 

Killer Bunnies Sequels

In addition to Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, there are a few sequels and expansions that can expand the game into all-out bunny warfare. Killer Bunnies and the Conquest of the Magic Carrot can either be played on its own or integrated into the original game. It has the same goal as the first game, but it contains extra booster packs for added variety.

There’s also a non-collectible card game version of Killer Bunnies called Kinder Bunnies: Their First Adventure that is geared towards young children. This spinoff card game features more simplistic gameplay that eschews the bunny-killing in favor of teaching kids to avoid safety hazards as they collect Carrots. The bright graphics and fun activities make it a perfect card game for teaching kids about skills like reading and teamwork.

Killer Bunnies: May the Best Bunny Win

Killer Bunnies is playable by 2-8 players, so it’s a great card game for any size group. It’s suitable for ages 12 and up due to the somewhat dark humor of the bunny-killing, although the mechanics are simple enough for children as young as 8. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which is a decent amount of time to really get into it without growing tired of the game.

Channel your inner predator and buy Killer Bunnies today

 

Dixit: The Surrealist Party Game

If surrealist art is your thing, then Dixit is the perfect party game for you. This fun and wacky game forces you to tap into your creative side to find the perfect clues for the images in front of you. Whether you’re the king of using your imagination or you’re more in touch with the logical side of your brain, Dixit is an incredibly fun card game that will bring out your playful side.

It’s Storytime!

Dixit is an excellent party card game that can be played in several fun-filled rounds. Every player gets a hand of six cards, each of which includes a single abstract picture without any text. On every round, a different player is designated the Storyteller. The Storyteller is tasked with choosing one of their cards and giving a clue about it before placing it facedown on the table. The clue can be either a word or a sentence.

Once the clue has been given, the other players will each choose one of their own cards that best match that clue. They’ll then place that card facedown on the table along with the Storyteller’s card. The cards are shuffled and then revealed face up on the table for everyone to see. The goal of each player is to try and guess which card was in fact the Storyteller’s card.

One of the best parts of the card game Dixit is the fact that it comes with large, beautifully illustrated cards. These abstract illustrations include things like ticking timepieces, unicorns and rainbow bridges, a sea of umbrellas, and fearsome dragons. All of the cards in the game are family-friendly, so you can easily enjoy the game with little kids or teenagers.

Making Guesses

The clue that the Storyteller gives is meant to be indicative of the picture on the card, but it shouldn’t be too direct. This is because the Storyteller wants at least one player to guess their card, while not wanting everyone to correctly guess it. The Storyteller will earn zero points if either everybody or nobody guesses their card. However, if one or more players guess their card, then both the Storyteller and the guesser will earn three points.

Players can also earn points in the event that another player guesses their card instead of the Storyteller’s. Once all of the guesses have been made and the points have been tallied, the next person in the circle becomes the Storyteller and the game continues. The game ends either when all of the cards in the deck have been played or when a player earns 30 points. If all of the cards are played, then the player with the most points wins.

Points are scored with a game board that comes with little rabbit tokens. Players will move their tokens around a track at the bottom of the game box as they earn points, watching their bunnies inch closer and closer to victory.

Dixit Expansions

Dixit comes with a couple of expansions and standalone games that take the simplicity of Dixit and expand it into something much more whimsical. Dixit: Journey allows your clue to take the form of a story, a song, or a movement that is associated with the card. Fortune favors the brave with this card game expansion, as you’ll have to put aside your stage fright and put on your dancing shoes to make your clue really stand out!

Dixit: Odyssey works as both a standalone game and expansion that features the same gameplay as the original Dixit in addition to 84 new cards. This expansion includes additional rabbit storing tokens, allowing up to 12 players to play.

Let the Art Do the Talking with Dixit

Dixit is playable by 3-6 players, so it’s a good party card game for small groups of people. However, if you forego the scoring board and simply keep track of the points manually, then you can accommodate more players. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, as it’s very family-friendly and easy to follow. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, so you can easily fit in a round or two before dinner.

Buy Dixit today and let your imagination run wild!

 

Phase 10: Don’t Get Left Behind!

If Rummy and Uno had a baby, it would be Phase 10. This card game uses colorful numbered cards to force you to collect unique sets in a race against your opponents. It’s a fast-paced game that’ll keep you on your toes as you draw and discard cards while pondering your opponents’ next moves. If you’re looking for a fun alternative to Rummy that you can play on the go, then Phase 10 is the perfect card game for you.

Completing the Phases

Phase 10 is played in multiple rounds, with each round forcing you to collect a certain set of cards in order to advance. At the beginning of the first round, all of the players are in Phase 1. This requires you to collect two sets of three identical numbers. Players will go around in a circle drawing and discarding one card at a time. 

Once a player completes the phase and discards their last card, the round ends. All the players who still have cards in their hands will receive a penalty to their score based on the number of cards they have left and their value. When the next round begins, all the players who collected the right cards to complete Phase 1 get to move onto Phase 2. Everyone else is forced to complete Phase 1 again.

Phase 10 continues for multiple rounds until one player manages to be the first to complete all 10 phases. The trick of the game comes from being able to know which cards to discard in order to quickly catch up and beat out the other players. While the rules are pretty simple, there is a little wiggle room for a strategy that can make this card game more complex than meets the eye.

Special Cards

There is another element of Phase 10 that makes it a bit more challenging: the special cards. These cards can really throw a wrench in the works by allowing you to skip over opposing players during their turn. You can also draw wild cards that can have any color or number that you choose, allowing you to complete your set.

One thing that can bog down Phase 10 is the length of the game time. If you play it according to the traditional rules, games can often last upwards of 2 hours. However, there is a common house rule that many people employ to speed things up and make the most use of the points system of the game. 

By allowing everyone to advance to the next phase regardless of whether or not they manage to complete the set, then you can get to the finish line much faster. If you play Phase 10 using this house rule, then the player who has the best score by the end of the game is crowned the winner. This can incentivize you to complete your sets and win as many phases as possible.

Phase 10 Twist

Phase 10 Twist is a sequel to the original card game that adds some interesting twists to the original game. Instead of just using a deck of cards, Phase 10 Twist comes with a board with a phase track. This can be used to move players along and easily score the game without having to count the cards every time.

This sequel card game also includes Twist spots that force players to choose a different phase to complete than the one they originally were assigned. Players can choose from the optional Twist phases that are more difficult than the regular phases but offer more of a reward for completing. This card game also includes three discard piles, giving you an additional strategic element to consider when shedding cards.

Better Keep Up with Phase 10

Phase 10 is playable by 2-6 players, so it’s an easy card game to play on a family camping trip. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, as it’s easy to comprehend and quick to pick up. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes to 2 hours, although it can be much shorter if you use the optional house rule.

Buy Phase 10 today and enjoy the lovechild of Rummy and Uno!

 

Bananagrams: Quit Monkeying Around!

Bananagrams is one of those classic word games that almost everyone has an edition of sitting around somewhere in their closet. With the trademark little felt banana bag and those user-friendly letter tiles, you can easily mix and match words to create your own crossword and be the first to shout out “Bananagrams!” If you’re a fan of classic word games like Scrabble or Boggle but are looking for something a little more fast-paced, you’ll love Bananagrams.

Arranging the Tiles

Bananagrams is an incredibly simple and fast-paced game that uses small tiles to form words in the shape of a grid. In this sense, it is incredibly similar to Scrabble, although Bananagrams gets rid of the game board and speeds things up by allowing each player to make their own grid. To make their words, players get to use 144 tiles that all come in a cute little bag shaped like a banana.

Bananagrams begins with all of the tiles being flipped and placed in the center of the table. Each player then takes 12 tiles and begins arranging them into words in the form of a grid, similar to the way a crossword is set up. Once a player uses up all of the letters in their bunch, they shout “peel!” and everyone has to take a new tile from the pool in the center.

If you’re stuck with a bunch of bum letters that you can’t place, then you can dump one of your tiles and draw three more. While this can help you dig your way out of the hole, beware! You may only find yourself deeper in the pit with more tiles you can’t use. Once the pool in the center of the table is almost empty, then the first person to use all of their tiles shouts out “Bananagrams!” and wins the game.

Variant Rules

Bananagrams is incredibly simple, with hands usually taking as little as 5 minutes. However, there are different variant rules within the game itself that you can use depending on where you are and how complex you want the game to be. The Banana Smoothie of the board game gives everyone their own bunch of tiles right at the start of the game, dividing it equally among everyone. This allows you to plan out your whole crossword right at the beginning.

The Banana Cafe version of Bananagrams is meant to be played in public when waiting for service. Players play with 21 tiles and are allowed to dump tiles and draw more if they need to, but they don’t have to “peel” and force anyone else to draw more tiles. You can also play the Banana Solitaire version of Bananagrams to play the game all on your own, competing against your own best time.

Bananagrams Sequels

There are several sequels to the original Bananagrams board game that allow you to play it with new and complex rules. Bananagrams Duel! turns the board game into a two-player word game that uses both letter cubes and Banana cards. Players use any side of their 12 letter cubes to try to create a crossword grid, competing for Banana cards to see who can win the most rounds.

Bananagrams Party adds 14 more “party power” tiles to the original game. These tiles range from The Re-Gifter to The Thief to Switcheroo, with each giving you a special power to use against your opponents. Bananagrams WildTiles adds 6 wild monkey tiles to the game, each of which can be used as whatever letter you like. This is similar to the wild tiles in Scrabble, which can help you make a new word when you can’t seem to find the letter you need. 

Bananagrams: Wordplay Never Tasted So Sweet

Bananagrams is playable by 1-8 players, so you can easily play it with the whole family or just on your own when you’re killing time. It’s suitable for ages 7 and up, as anyone can grasp the simplicity of the rules. Playing time lasts around 15 minutes, although you’ll definitely be playing best of 5 or best of 10.

Buy Bananagrams and add this classic tile game to your collection of word games!

 

Munchkin: The Card Game for Monster-Killers and Backstabbers

Does the idea of killing monsters and stealing from your friends sound like a good time to you?  If so, you’ll love the hilarious card game Munchkin, a D&D-inspired game that takes the dungeon experience and flips it on its head.  Grab the Horny Helmet and vanquish the Plutonium Dragon to level up in this fantastic card game that will keep you laughing the entire time.

Kicking Down the Door

In Munchkin, each player begins their turn by “kicking down the door”, which involves drawing a Door Card from random.  Door Cards belong to several different categories.  The first are Curse Cards, which give you a certain negative effect.  If you have the bad luck to draw a Curse Card, you may end up having to forfeit your turn or go back a certain number of levels.  These usually come with funny little drawings such as the “Duck of Doom”, which curses you for being silly enough to pick up a duck in a dungeon (what were you thinking?)

Door Cards can also be Item, Race, or Class Cards that you get to add to your hand to be played at a future time.  These can be helpful in attacking opponents during their turns or in giving yourself a valuable boost in fighting monsters.  The last kind of Door Card is a Monster Card, which pits you against a ferocious creature in an opportunity to either level up or suffer the consequences.

Level Up but Don’t Get Killed

Munchkin begins with all players starting at level 1.  Whoever is the first to reach level 10 is declared the winner, but you’ll have to fight off some monsters if you want to level up.  Monster fights will pit your total level against the level of the monster to decide who wins the round.  The real excitement of the game comes from the fact that your fellow players can either choose to help you defeat the monster (in exchange for Treasure Cards) or add another monster to the mix to try and crush you.

If you win the fight and defeat the monster, you can draw a certain amount of Treasure Cards and level up.  If you lose, however, you’ll have to roll the dice to try and get away.  Anything less than a five will force you to deal with the “Bad Stuff” on the monster card, which can result in losing levels or Treasure Cards.  You may even die as a result of losing the battle, which doesn’t disqualify you from the game but does force you to end your turn and draw a new hand for equipment.

Munchkins Sequels and Expansions

Munchkin has spawned countless sequels that can be played on their own or added to the original game for an even wilder good time.  Munchkin Adventure Time is based on everyone’s favorite show on Cartoon Network, incorporating art and characters from the series.  Munchkin Booty sets the game on the high seas, forcing you to battle vividly drawn pirates drawn by Guest Artist Tom Siddell.  Expansions such as Munchkin Apocalypse add natural disasters, zombie takeovers, and alien invasions in addition to new mechanics for more complex gameplay.

Kill, Steal, and Stab: The Munchkin Way

Munchkin is playable by 3-6 players, so it’s definitely well suited for small to medium groups of friends who’ve grown tired of playing the traditional Dungeons and Dragons card game.  Newcomers to card games will also find plenty to love with the simple rules and amazing illustrations done by John Kovalic, which add a unique level of style and fun to the game.

Munchkin is suitable for ages 10 and up, so families can definitely get a kick out of all that it has to offer.  With a playing time of one to two hours, you can make an entire night out of a game without losing interest.  Thanks to its potential for cooperation and ruthless backstabbing, Munchkin is a game that can make or break friendships in an instant.  If you’re looking for a game with humor, strategy, and excellent artwork, Munchkin and any one of its numerous expansions will provide countless hours of fun.

 

Red Dragon Inn: Party Like a Hero

Sure, everybody knows the story of the heroic adventurers who save the day, slay the evil monsters, and collect their share of the treasure.  But what happens to them after they’ve finished their righteous conquest?  A night of drinking, gambling, and roughhousing of course.  Red Dragon Inn is a comical game with rapscallion characters engaged in a debauched good time.  

Choose Your Adventurer

In Red Dragon Inn, players get to choose between four different heroic adventurers who’ve just come back from a fresh conquest.  Each character comes with their own special deck of cards that provides them with unique abilities during the game.  The first is Deirdre the Priestess, an elf under the protection of a goddess that can get her out of scrapes and help her heal.  

Fiona the Volatile, on the other hand, is a tough female warrior who can cheer on her fellow players to drink more heavily while turning her own drinks into greater strength.  Gerki the Sneak comes with plenty of cheat cards that make him an excellent gambler (as well as a few poisons hidden up his sleeves).  The last is Zot the Wizard, whose half-demonic pet rabbit Pookey aids him in his quest to drain the other players of their gold.

Gambling, Drinking, and Roughhousing

Every player gets their own board where they can store their decks, discards, and drink cards.  Players start out with ten gold coins and seven cards that they can use to gamble, drink, and gain the upper hand against the other players.  Each turn gives you several options: you can discard however many cards you like and redraw, you can play an action card, or you can buy a drink for someone else.

Buying a drink for someone else will add another drink card to their stack, but it also forces you to take a drink yourself by drawing a card from your own stack.  While this may end up raising your alcohol content and getting you one step closer to passing out, you may end up gaining fortitude from the drink.  You can only play one action card per term, and these cards will usually force the other players to either take damage or drink more.  

Hold Onto Your Coins—and Your Sobriety

Some action cards will trigger a round of gambling, which invites each of the players to bet their gold and play their gambling cards.  Some characters are better at gambling than others, so your character’s profile will play heavily into your strategy of whether or not to favor gambling or drinking.

If a player’s alcohol content gets too high, they’ll pass out and lose the game.  However, running out of gold coins from gambling too much will also kick you out of the game.  The winner is whoever manages to be the last person to hold onto their coins and stay conscious.

Red Dragon Inn Sequels

Red Dragon Inn has spawned a handful of standalone sequel games that can also be integrated with the original game.  Red Dragon Inn 2 adds characters such as Dimli the Dwarf, a gold-hoarder who can handle his liquor like nobody’s business.  It also adds Fleck the Bard, a music loving half-elf who steals the hearts of all the girls.

Red Dragon Inn 6: Villains puts a unique twist on the premise of the game by taking on the villain’s perspective.  With this dark and twisted sequel, you can engage in Boss Battle mode that pits all the players against one evil villain.  No matter which Red Dragon Inn sequel you choose, you’ll be able to enjoy fun new characters that can make the original game even more expansive.

Enjoy the Spoils of the Hunt with Red Dragon Inn

Red Dragon Inn is suitable for ages 13 and up, mostly due to its slightly adult themes.  It can serve 2-4 players, but adding expansion can allow for larger groups and parties of up to 8.  Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which should make for a decent round of debauched fun.  With Red Dragon Inn, you’ll be sure to enjoy its lighthearted nature and clever spin on the classic “hero.”

 

 

How to Play The Red Dragon Inn

Jenga: How High Can You Go?

Jenga is one of those party games that never gets old. We all remember the heart-pounding tension of trying to wiggle out that little wooden block without causing the whole tower to topple over. Because Jenga is more focused on physical dexterity than strategy, you’ll be sure to enjoy refining your tower stacking skills with this classic board game that never disappoints.

Building the Tower

Jenga is played with 54 wooden blocks that are each three times as long as they are wide. The blocks are stacked three in a row side by side to form a square, with three blocks then stacked perpendicularly on top of the previous stack. This means that if the bottom row of blocks is facing north and south, then the row above will face east and west (and so on and so forth).

The game begins with one player building the tower by stacking the rows of blocks on top of each other. There are going to be a total of 18 different stories of blocks once the tower is first built, although the number of stories will increase once the game has begun. Jenga usually comes with a loading tray that helps you stack the initial tower, since it would usually be pretty tedious doing it by hand.

One of the trickiest aspects of this party game is that each Jenga block is not created to be identical. Each block has small, random variations that make stacking them more difficult and make the game more challenging.

Deconstructing the Tower

The game is then played in turns as each player takes one block from almost any level of the tower and places it on top of the tower. The only level you’re not allowed to take a block from is either the top incomplete level or the one below it. This means that you’ll have to find certain blocks within the tower that you can safely remove without threatening the integrity of the tower itself.

If you end up knocking over the tower, then you lose the game. You’ll want to move carefully as you remove blocks, as one wrong move can result in a pile of fallen Jenga blocks. Some players find it helpful to tap a block before removing it to make sure that they can get it out without knocking over the tower. However, you must only use one hand at a time to remove blocks from the tower.

After each turn, players are allowed to wait 10 seconds before taking the next turn in order to see whether or not gravity will take its course and knock the tower over. If you remove a block and the tower falls over within 10 seconds, then you lose the game. If the tower falls over in the middle of the other player’s turn after 10 seconds have passed, however, then they lose even if they have yet to touch the tower.

Jenga Sequels

There are a few sequel versions of Jenga that add fun new mechanics to the game and make it a bit more complex. Jenga: Super Mario allows you to play as characters such as Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, or Toad by taking character pegs and slotting them into blocks inside the tower. Players will use a spinner to decide how many layers their character is allowed to climb and how many blocks they have to remove.

There’s also a Monopoly Jenga that combines all of the fun of Jenga with the classic board game Monopoly. This version of Jenga is similar to the block balancing mechanics of the regular party game, but each block represents properties you need to collect and may earn you points or abilities.

Move Gently with Jenga

Jenga is playable by 1-8 players, as it’s just as fun to play by yourself as it is with a small group of friends. It’s suitable for ages 6 and up, so it’s a great party game to play at kid’s parties or with families. Playing time for Jenga lasts around 20 minutes, but you’ll almost certainly want to play multiple rounds.

Buy Jenga today and let the blocks fall where they may!

 

The Great Dalmuti: Make Your Way Through the Middle Ages

There’s a reason we have the saying that something is “positively Medieval”. The Middle Ages were a time of artistic suppression and oppressive social hierarchy. This may have made for a terrible living situation, but it certainly provides fodder for an imaginative and inventive card game. The Great Dalmuti takes on the classism of the Middle Ages by casting characters as different members of society in an effort to rise through the ranks and be crowned the Great Dalmuti.

Play or Pass

The Great Dalmuti comes with a deck of 80 cards. Each card ranks from 1-12, with the lower the number, the better the rank. There are as many cards in each rank as the number of the rank, meaning there’s only one 1 card, there are two 2s, three 3s, and so on. The Great Dalmuti also includes two Jesters, which are the wild cards of the game that can be played with any of the other cards.

The goal of The Great Dalmuti is to be the first person to get rid of all the cards in your hand. You’ll play the cards in sets of the same rank, starting with the leader. The next player must play the exact same number of cards from a lower rank. This means if the first player sets down three 8s, then the next player must set down three cards ranked 7 or below. 

If you can’t set down any cards, then you can pass. Once all of the players have passed and no one can lay down any more cards, the next round begins. The last person to lay down cards from the previous round becomes the next round’s leader. This is a major advantage, as you get to set the pace for the rest of the round.

Becoming the Great Dalmuti

Whoever becomes the first person to successfully lay down all of their cards gets crowned the Great Dalmuti. Being crowned the Great Dalmuti is an excellent honor, as you get to lead the next hand. But the rest of the players each have their own roles as well, dictated by where they sit in relation to the Great Dalmuti. 

The player to their left is known as the Lesser Dalmuti, while the last person to play is known as the Greater Peon. The second to last player is called the Lesser Peon, and everyone in the middle is a simple merchant. The ranking system is not only symbolic of the classism in the Middle Ages but also has actual implications for the game. Both Peons are “taxed” at the beginning of each hand, being forced to cough up one or two of their lowest ranking cards to exchange with the two Dalmutis for cards from their hand.

However, there is a chance for social justice. If one player gets dealt both Jesters, they can call a revolution and suspend the taxes for the turn. If the Greater Peon gets both Jesters, they can call for a Greater Revolution and swap roles with the Dalmutis. This adds a fun element of chaos to the game that can upend your strategy and reverse the luck just when you need it the most.

The Great Dalmuti Spinoff

The Great Dalmuti has a spinoff version of the game titled Dilbert: Corporate Shuffle, a card game that features beloved cartoon character Dilbert as he tries to climb his way up the corporate ladder. This spinoff to The Great Dalmuti adds a few new cards and rules while featuring unique Dilbert comics that add to the aesthetic and humor of the game.

The Great Dalmuti: A Medieval Card Game with Modern Day Fun

The Great Dalmuti is playable by 4-8 players, although it’s generally best as a party game with at least 6 players. It’s also suitable for ages 8 and up, so it’s great for kids’ parties as well as adults. Playing time lasts around 60 minutes, although you can pretty much play however many rounds you like. 

The Great Dalmuti stands out with gorgeously illustrated cards and fast-paced gameplay mechanics. Take a trip to the Middle Ages and enjoy the beautiful illustrations of The Great Dalmuti! Buy it today!

 

Bingo: A Classic American Pastime

Bingo goes back centuries as a fun party game that forces you to be on your toes. Whether you’re playing Bingo at home with a group of your closest friends or you’re in a grand hall playing with a hundred other people, this board game will have you on the edge of your seat. With simple rules and countless possibilities for switching things up, Bingo is a party game that works for all occasions.

Marking Your Card

Bingo is incredibly easy to play, as all it requires is a small board and a marking device. Players will be given boards in a 5×5 grid that they’ll have to mark each round whenever a new combination is called. Depending on what version of the game you’re playing, you can mark spaces on your board with a pen, a pencil, or something temporary such as a bean or a chip.

The board is set up with five columns of the letters B-I-N-G-O. Each column then has five rows, with a different number in each row. Every player has a different board, so the numbers in the five rows vary based on each board. However, there are usually 15 different numbers that can possibly be within each column. This means that column B uses the numbers 1-15, column I uses the numbers 16-30, and so on and so forth.

The game of Bingo designates one person to call out a number and letter combination each turn, usually using a roulette wheel or by drawing random cards. This gives everyone else the opportunity to see whether or not they have that space on their game board. 

For example, the caller may say “B5”, in which case each player will see whether or not there is a number 5 underneath their B column. If they do have the space, then they mark it. If not, they wait until the next combination is called out.

Ways to Win

The standard rules for Bingo require you to have five spaces in a row marked out before you can win. This can be five in one row, five in one column, or even five diagonally. The center space of the board is also marked as a free space, which can help people win more easily. Once you’ve successfully made a row of five, you have to call out “Bingo!” in order to win. The caller will then check your board to make sure you marked everything correctly.

Bingo has a few different criteria for winning that you can choose from to make it a little bit harder. For example, players may need to make a “T” on their board by filling all of the spaces in the top row and middle column. Or, you may play what’s called a “blackout”, where players have to fill every space on the board in order to win. Just make sure you call “Bingo!” in a timely manner, as someone else may call it first and beat you to the punch.

Bingo Variations

There are quite a few variations of the board game Bingo that you can play. One of the most adorable is Dog Bingo, which uses different breeds of dogs instead of letters and numbers. Under five columns filled with pictures of different dog breeds, the caller will hold up one card at a time for you to mark. There are three patterns for you to choose from in order to win (P, A, and W). Once you win, instead of calling out the classic “Bingo!” you’ll call out “Woof!”

There’s also a Marvel Avengers Assemble Bingo game that features illustrations from the world of Avengers on one side with differently colored shapes on the other. This board game is perfect for children to practice their Bingo skills and enjoy their favorite Marvel characters at the same time.

That’s a Bingo!

Bingo is playable by 2 or more players, with no upper limit on the number of people who can play. It’s suitable for ages 5 and up, as young children can easily follow along and mark their boards. Playing time lasts around an hour, but it depends on how many rounds you choose to play.

Buy Bingo today and enjoy the thrill of this classic party game!

Twister: The Party Game That Will Bring You Closer Than Ever

Twister is a staple at any party, giving you a chance to loosen your tie, pull off your loafers, and get yourself into all sorts of precarious positions.  Unlike many board games in which everyone sits around a table moving pieces around a board, Twister gives you a chance to move your body and enjoy a wacky intertwining of limbs and body parts with your friends and family.  This party game is sure to liven up even the most boring of parties and keep you going round after round.

That Hits the Spot

Twister is played with a large vinyl playing mat lined with colored dots.  Each dot is around 6 inches in diameter, arranged in an array of 6 x 4.  Dots come in the colors of blue, green, red, and yellow, which correspond to the various colors on the spinner.  Each turn, players will have to put one of their hands or feet on a certain color dot on the mat without falling over.

At the beginning of each round, one player is designated the moderator whose role is to spin the spinner, which will land on one of those four colors.  Each player will then have to put either their left hand, right hand, left foot, or right foot on a dot with that color.  While the first few rounds are pretty easy, the game gets progressively harder as players try to reach over one another to place certain body parts on spaces without falling over.

The only way you can take off one of your hands or feet from a certain space is if the spinner tells you to move it to a different color.  However, if the spinner tells you to put your left hand on green (for example) and your left hand is already on green, then you have to move it to a different spot of the same color.  This will force you to move around each turn and make it much more difficult to keep your balance.

Winning Twister

A player gets eliminated when they either lose their balance or touch an elbow or knee to the ground.  The game continues until only one player is left on the mat without having lost their balance.  You can then begin the game again for another round, giving a new person the role of moderator and allowing everyone a chance to join in on the fun.

One of the toughest parts of Twister is that no two players can share the same spot (if you’re playing it with only two players).  This will have you rushing to claim the closest space to you in order to more easily keep your balance.  If you move too slow, you run the risk of losing the space to one of your rivals and being forced to put your body part on a space much further away.

Different Versions of Twister

Twister has been an American classic ever since actress Eva Gabor played it with Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show in 1966.  Since then, there have been many different versions of the game. One of the most intriguing variations of Twister is Blindfolded Twister, which uses four different tactile symbols on the mat.  In this version of the game, players are blindfolded and forced to find the right circle by using their sense of touch.

Don’t Get Spun Out with Twister

Twister is playable by 2-4 players, although one additional player can act as the moderator and switch out in between rounds.  This party game is suitable for ages 6 and up, as the rules are incredibly simple to learn.  Playing time lasts around 10 minutes, but you can keep the game going as long as you like by playing more rounds.

Twister is a classic party game that is great for breaking the ice and putting people in funny and precarious positions.  It’s definitely a game that doesn’t shy away from the physical, so make sure you’re nice and limber before you roll out the Twister mat—otherwise you just might end up losing your balance! Try your best to hold onto your balance and buy Twister today.

 

5 Second Rule: Just Spit it Out!

Trivia board games often favor people who have a deep and encyclopedic knowledge of a bunch of different categories. With 5 Second Rule, however, the playing field gets leveled by forcing everyone to think on their feet. Sure, you’re a major film buff, but can you name three movie directors in only 5 seconds? With wacky categories and fast-paced gameplay, 5 Second Rule is the perfect party game to break the ice and loosen everyone up.

5 Seconds on the Clock

5 Second Rule has an incredibly simple premise. As its name suggests, this board game gives you 5 seconds on the clock to name three types of “something” based on the category of the card you draw. Each round, the reader will read a card to the next player in the hot seat, telling them to “Name 3 _____”. Players who guess all three correctly will win the card, which counts as one point.

These categories can be anything from picnic foods and shoe brands to more complicated guesses like Big Ten colleges or movie directors. The board game comes with a box of 288 double-sided cards, giving you a whopping 576 different categories to choose from. 

It also comes with a giant timer full of metal balls, which is incredibly fun to use. One highlight of the game comes from whoever gets to flip the timer, watching the metal balls spin around until they hit the bottom with a loud clang.

Part of the fun of 5 Second Rule is the random stuff that comes out of your mouth as you try and quickly spit out three dog breeds in only 5 seconds. There’s no penalty for wrong guesses as long as you correctly guess all three by the end of your time, so just say whatever comes to mind! You’ll be sure to crack up laughing at all of the hilarious knee-jerk associations your friends and family come up with off the top of their heads.

Going Round the Circle

5 Second Rule puts a fun spin on the basic mechanics of the game that keeps everyone on their toes. If the player who is guessing that round guesses all three correctly, they win a point and the game moves to the next person with a new card. However, if they guess wrong, then the timer immediately gets flipped, forcing the next player in line to guess in the same category.

The tricky part comes from the fact that the next player isn’t allowed to use any of the answers given by the last player. If the next player can’t guess it either, then it moves down the line again until someone can eventually name all three. If no one correctly guesses all three, then the original player gets to keep the card and win a point.

5 Second Rule Spinoffs

5 Second Rule is a pretty fast-paced game, although its mechanics are relatively simple. Players who are looking for something a little more complex will love 5 Second Rule: Spintensity, the spinoff game that adds a spinner to the mix to give you three choices for what to do after you guess correctly.

There’s also a version of 5 Second Rule that’s fit for younger players called 5 Second Rule Jr. This version simplifies the categories, giving you easy guesses like ice cream flavors. In the opposite direction, the spinoff 5 Second Rule: Uncensored gives you all sorts of naughty categories that are fit only for players 18 and up.

Better Think Quick with 5 Second Rule

5 Second Rule is playable by 3 or more players, as there is truly no limit to the number of people who can play a game. This makes it the perfect flexible party game for almost any occasion. It’s suitable for ages 10 and up, although you can easily get the family-friendly spinoff if you’d like to include younger players.

The playing time for 5 Second Rule is around 30 minutes, but you can truly play on for as long or as short as you like. Buy 5 Second Rule today and enjoy the crazy things that’ll fly out of the mouths of your loved ones!

 

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