Grandpa Beck’s Golf: The Perfect Card Game For Any Age

While traditional golf may not sound like the kind of game that younger players would enjoy, Grandpa Beck’s Golf is interesting for kids and adults alike. This game takes the classic face card game and adds new cards and rules. Grandpa Beck’s Golf combines luck and strategy to allow for dynamic competition at a nice relaxed pace. Whether you’re looking for a game to play with the kids, or for something grandma and grandpa would enjoy, Grandpa Beck’s Golf is a swing and a hit!

Laying Down The Grid

The game starts with each golfer being dealt 9 cards, which they lay face down in a 3 by 3 grid. Each player then turns over two cards of their choosing, without peeking at the rest of them. The other cards in the deck stay in the middle of the table, with a separate draw pile and discard pile. The game takes place in rounds, with each player taking their turn to draw a card from either their own grid, the draw pile, or the discard pile.

Lowest Score Wins The Game

The fun of the game comes from the strategy in which you draw cards and set up your grid. Because the golfer with the lowest score is the winner in a traditional game of golf, whoever ends up with the lowest score in Grandpa Beck’s Golf wins the game. You can lower your score by collecting negative value red cards, which signify things like a birdie or hole in one and subtract anywhere from 1 to 4 points from your score.

Black cards will add points to your score, but if you collect three of the same black cards in a row, then you get to subtract those points from your overall score. You can make rows horizontally or vertically, but sadly not diagonally, so be sure to plan accordingly. You’ll have to strategize carefully in order to arrange the cards in the perfect order to nab the negative bonus before your competition has a chance to act first!

Mulligans And Hazards

There are two more card types that make Grandpa Beck’s Golf more than just a game of numbers. The Mulligan cards are some of the most powerful cards in the game, acting as wild cards to be used in place of a black card of any number. Hazard cards, on the other hand, will add 10 points to your overall score, so make sure to discard these toxic cards as quickly as possible.

The game ends once one of the players flips over the final card in their grid. If this player has the lowest score on the board, they win a bonus of -5 points. If someone else has a lower or identical score, however, then they get a penalty of +10 points. Any player who has cards that haven’t already been flipped over will have these cards added to their overall score, which can be devastating if you end up with a hidden hazard card among your bunch! As the game draws to a close, you’ll have to keep an eye on all of the other players to make sure that you’ll come out ahead by ending the game.

Tee Up With Grandpa Beck’s Golf

The best thing about Grandpa Beck’s Golf is how flexible it can to accommodate all different types of players. It’s playable by 2-5 players, which makes it perfect for families as well as for a one-on-one game between grandpa and grandson. Because it’s suitable for ages 8 and up, it’s a great way to connect different generations by giving them something to play that everyone can enjoy.

Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, but because there is no set amount of rounds in the game, you can pretty much play it as long or as short as you want to. Be sure to specify the number of rounds you want to play before you begin in order to give the game a firm endpoint (and protect you from accusations of quitting too soon!) With simple rules and entertaining game play, Grandpa Beck’s Golf is a family game for all generations.

Tee up some fun today!

 

Lords of Waterdeep: Explore a Detailed World

From the magical world of Dungeons & Dragons comes Lords of Waterdeep, a strategy board game that pits secretive and power-hungry masked rulers against one another in a campaign to grasp control of the city. Lords of Waterdeep combines resource gathering with card playing in an intricate and fantastical experience that will have you backstabbing your closest friends to win some much-needed victory points. The fantasy and political intrigue of Lords of Waterdeep elevate this board game from a forgettable worker placement game into a magical quest.

The Masked Lords of Waterdeep

In the Forgotten Realms, there lies a most fantastical city named Waterdeep, the City of Splendors. As one of the masked Lords of Waterdeep, you’ll secretly recruit adventurers to embark on quests and bring back rewards with which you can grow your political influence. Lords of Waterdeep is all about the secret back-alley dealings and double crosses that determine who holds the true power of the city.

At the beginning of the game, each player will take on the role of one of the five Lords of Waterdeep. The game box comes with five different cardstock player mats with which you’ll conduct your various deeds. It also comes with hundreds of different cards, cubes, meeples, and other little colored trinkets that fill the game with colorful flourishes.

Adventurers, Rewards, and Quests

As one of the Lords of Waterdeep, you’ll control agents who will recruit adventurers to perform certain quests for them and earn rewards. These rewards will sometimes come in the form of victory points, which boost your influence over Waterdeep and get you one step closer to winning the game. Whoever wins the most victory points by the end of the eighth round is declared the winner, so you’ll have to act fast if you don’t want to fall behind.

The adventure resources are represented as purple, orange, black, and white cubes that are based on the four character classes of Dungeons & Dragons. Certain adventurers are better suited for certain quests—will your adventurer succeed in Skullduggery or does their strength lie in Commerce? You’ll need to stay on your toes and strategize if you want to block the other Lords from gaining control.

Scoundrels of Skullport Expansion

A single expansion was released in 2013 called Scoundrels of Skullport, which adds two expansion modules to the base game of Lords of Waterdeep. Whether you dive into the Undermountain module; explore the Skullport module; or add both expansions to the game, you’ll get a whole host of new game boards, cards, and tokens with which to play.

Undermountain adds an interesting new mechanic that allows you to place resources on the game board spaces while also offering you more expensive but rewarding quests. Skullport adds the corruption mechanic to the game, which includes the new corruption track game board and 25 corruption tokens. These can rob you of crucial victory points and make winning the game that much harder. If you’re a fan of Lords of Waterdeep and are looking to further explore the magical Forgotten Realm, the Scoundrels of Skullport expansion is an excellent addition to the base game.

Take Over the City of Splendor with Lords of the Waterdeep

Lords of Waterdeep is playable by 2-5 players, so it’s perfect for small to medium groups of friends who are looking for a new strategy board game to add to the mix. Dungeons & Dragons lovers will enjoy the familiar fantasy elements, while fantasy lovers in general will marvel at the creative imagination of the game’s designers.

Lords of Waterdeep is a somewhat lengthy game, with a playing time of one to two hours. However, hardcore strategy gamers will find gameplay completely manageable, especially when compared to most D&D quests. Lords of Waterdeep is also suitable for ages 12 and up, so it’s a great game for younger players who are looking to get into more advanced concepts of strategy and fantasy. While there are many tokens and cards to keep track of throughout the game, both beginners and advanced players alike can enjoy the adventure that lies within the Lords of Waterdeep.

Adjust your mask and plot your way to victory!

 

Can You Save The Kittens In A Blender? 

Every once in a while a board game comes along that’s so twisted and so adorable that you can’t help but take notice. Kittens In A Blender puts a diabolical twist on your favorite furry friends by putting them in danger of being turned into a fluffy smoothie! You’ll have to act fast and make some hard choices if you want to save your kittens and win the game. Kittens In A Blender is a delightfully wicked board game with dynamic gameplay and buckets of laughs.

The Blender, the Box, and the Counter

Kittens In A Blender has several places for the kitties to roam in the kitchen. The first is the deadly Blender, which is represented by the game box top with an oversized Blender card inside. This is the place you want to avoid allowing your kittens to enter, as all of the kittens that are playing in the Blender when the Blend card is played will be destroyed!

The next location is the Box, which is represented by the base of the game box with an oversized Box card inside it. This space is safe for kittens to play in. Whenever a Blend card is played, all of the kittens playing inside the Box will be saved, living to meow another day. Saved kittens earn you two points each at the end of the game, so getting your kittens inside the Box is a major goal of the board game.

The last location is the Counter, which is represented by a space in between the Blender and the Box. When a Blend card is played, all of the kittens on the Counter will be moved to the Blender. There is a way for a player to stop the Blender from destroying the kittens, however. By playing a Pulse card, a player can counter a Blend card and stop the bloodshed from occurring.

Moving the Kittens Around

In Kittens In A Blender, each player is assigned a Kitten color at the beginning of the game, which is either red, green, blue, or yellow. The deck is then shuffled, and each player is dealt six cards with which to play. Players will then take turns playing two cards each round, drawing back up to six after they play. If they choose to play a Kitten card, they’ll play it directly into either the Blender, the Counter, or the Box.

Other cards will be played face up in front of the player, giving everyone a chance to see the cards being played. The non-Kitten cards will either be the deadly Blend card or cards that will move the kittens around. Kittens on the Move will move kittens around the board wherever you choose, while Kittens in the Blender will move all of the kittens from either the Counter or the Box directly to the Blender.

There’s also a fun wild card called Dog’s in the Kitchen, which forces each player to give their hand to whichever player is indicated by the direction on the card. Once all 16 of the Blend cards have been played, players tally up points to see who wins. Saved kittens earn you two points each, while blended kittens will cost you one point each.

Kittens In a Blender Expansion

Kittens In A Blender comes with an expansion pack called More Kittens In A Blender that adds 32 unique kittens to the game. These kittens come in two different colors, allowing you to play the game with up to six players. This expansion to the board game also adds Flavors such as Vanilla Extract or Strawberries to the mix that can help you make a delicious smoothie out of your blended kittens and earn extra points. How diabolical!

Kittens In a Blender: Save the Kitties!

Kittens In A Blender is playable by 2-4 players, although the expansion allows up to six. This board game is suitable for ages 8 and up, as the mechanics are easy to follow even if the humor is a little much for young children. Playing time lasts around 20-40 minutes, so it’s a great icebreaker board game.

Save the adorable little kitties and buy Kittens In A Blender today!

 

UNO: The One Card Game To Rule Them All

UNO has been one of the most popular card games in the world ever since it was first released in 1971. The thrill of laying down cards and racing to be the first to shout out “Uno!” is a thrill that never dies down. If you’re looking for a card game to play for your next family trip, look no further—the classic UNO is the way to go!

Make Your Match

The goal of the card game UNO is to get rid of all of the cards in your hand before one of the other players does the same. This is easier said than done, however, as cards must be played in a very specific order. You’re also up against competitive opponents who will skip your turns, force you to draw cards, and hit you with a last-minute “Uno!” to steal victory away from you.

Players all draw a hand of 7 cards, placing the rest of the cards facedown to form a draw pile. The first player will then turn over the top card of the draw pile to begin the discard pile, which each player will take turns discarding cards into. If a player can’t play any cards, then they have to draw a card and lose their turn. If the card they draw can be played, however, they are allowed to play it during their turn.

The main UNO cards come in different numbers and colors, such as red 5s and green 7s. In order to play a card on the discard pile, your card must match either the number or the color of the previous card. This means that if there’s a red 5 on the discard pile, you have to play either a red card of any number or a 5 of any color.

Wild and Special Cards

There are a few cards that throw a wrench in the works and screw up the other players. Skip cards will skip over the next player in line, while Reverse cards will reverse the direction of play. There’s also the dastardly Draw 2 card, which forces the next player in line to draw 2 cards and lose their turn. 

These cards each have different colors, which must match the color of the previous card in order to be played. This means that the most powerful of all the cards in UNO are the Wild cards. The regular Wild card allows you to change to any color you choose, while the Wild Draw 4 card does the same while forcing the next player to draw 4 cards and lose their turn.

The trademark of UNO comes from what happens when you get down to the wire. When a player discards their second-to-last card, leaving them with only one card left, they must shout “Uno!” If another player beats them to the punch and says it first, then that player must draw 2 cards. A forgotten “Uno!” has been known to derail many close victories!

UNO Remix

There’s a sequel card game to UNO called UNO Remix that features the traditional UNO gameplay with a fun new twist. This remix allows you to add special personalized cards to the deck at the beginning of each round. With the personalized cards, you can mark the card to do whatever you like. For example, you can force a specific player to draw 2 cards or even block a penalty card.

This remix of the original UNO takes the ordinary cutthroat competitiveness of the original card game and turns it into a bloodbath. You’ll be sure to fight fire with fire once you get your hands on a personalized deck of UNO cards!

Call It Like It Is with UNO

UNO is playable by 2-10 players, making it an excellent card game for groups of all sizes. It’s suitable for ages 6 and up, so you don’t have to worry about younger kids being left out of the fun on family game day. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, but you can play an infinite number of rounds (and you most likely will want to).

Buy UNO today and enjoy the fun you feel when you hit your sibling with that awesome Draw 2 card!

How to Spell Murder (of Crows)

The rules of Murder of Crows are straightforward. Two to six players take turns drawing cards and playing card powers, attempting to spell “murder” before anyone else.

Overall Gameplay

On your turn, you draw two cards from the deck or one card from the discard pile (which may include cards played by other players). If you play a card, it must be played either adjacent to another card in front of you or directly behind one card already in front of you – thus, forming a 3×3 grid which represents your murder scene. The card’s special power takes place immediately, but it stays in place until someone plays a card that covers it up or until the end of the game. When all nine lines have been filled with cards, that round of play ends.

Types of Cards

To win, you have to be the first player to spell “murder” – each card played must touch at least one card of the same letter or row. The rules for word challenges are as follows:

A-Arrow cards (♣) can slide any card horizontally along a line, as long as it keeps touching at least one card. If multiple cards can be moved with an arrow card’s power, they move in turn from left to right; if two arrow cards affect the same card and there is no order specified (or that order is unclear), resolve them in reverse alphabetical order by card title (e.g., A then K).

I-If a card is played next to two cards with arrows on them, those card must slide according to both card’s directions. When an “I” card affects another card, the player controlling the card whose power is being used decides which direction it moves. If there are multiple players controlling those cards, they can choose their own directions for the card movement – but if they cannot agree, default to left unless otherwise specified (e.g., K♠ and I♥ would move the ♥ three spaces north and one space east).

Eligible words: all standard Scrabble words; additionally including names that start with I (e.g., Ike)

J-Jokers (♣) may be played anywhere, but once they are played they must be covered by another card (which does not necessarily have to be the card resulting from their power). If multiple jokers affect one card, they may choose any card direction.

Q-Once a card with an “Q” is placed it cannot be moved or uncovered during the game. However, you can put both of your cards on top of it to flag it for yourself so other players will know not to place additional cards there. At the end of each round, any player who has not yet spelled murder can cover their own “Q” card with one card of their choice (if they do not have any cards left, it does not count as a murder).

X-If an “X” card is placed at the end of a word (i.e., if it’s touching nothing), flip it over to its alternate side which reads “-x-” and use its power again. If instead you play an “X” card touching another card, use both card’s powers in order (e.g., I♥-I♣-IXX would move the ♥ three spaces north, then the ♣ four spaces west, then the XX one space south).

Z-Cards with “Z” card powers are wild and may be placed on any card played on the table, regardless of the card’s direction or original placement. A card on top of a card can completely cover an “X” card power, if necessary.

M U R D E R

Once someone plays their final card to spell murder, play continues in reverse alphabetical order until there is a clear winner or at least two players tie for the win. If multiple players tie, whoever played their final card most recently wins.

If a card is played next to two cards with arrows on them, those card must slide according to both card’s directions. When an “I” card affects another card, the player controlling the card whose power is being used decides which direction it moves. If there are multiple players controlling those cards, they can choose their own directions for the card movement – but if they cannot agree, default to left unless otherwise specified (e.g., K♠ and I♥ would move the ♥ three spaces north and one space east).

Spell Murder Today and buy Murder of Crows from Fantastic Games!

 

 

Spot It!: The Family Game of Matching

Spot it! is a card game for 2 to 8 players, but can be played with up to 13. Super unlucky number, I know…

Spot It! has 55 circular cards each of which contains eight symbols varying by shape and color. One card will contain all the symbols matching in either shape or color (or both), while the other card will show something different; this is what you are matching.

Spot It! requires speed, observation skills, and pattern recognition to find matches between pairs of cards as quickly as possible and get rid of your hand before everyone else. The winner is the player who gets rid of their cards first and has collected the fewest cards at that point; ties go to the player with more sets.

This card game was created in 2008 by Blue Orange Games, an American game publisher that offers an array of card games, board games, puzzle toys, and party games. The game was the winner of Dr. Toy’s 10 Best Active Play Games Award in 2011, among many other awards.

Spot It! has also earned the Specialty Retailers’ 2012 Game Of The Year Award as well as multiple Teachers’ Choice Awards for its educational value.

Some card games may last up to 30 minutes or so but Spot it! can be finished much faster than that since each hand usually lasts only a few minutes. This card game is perfect for a family night where everyone will have fun matching symbols while competing against one another at the same time!

The Many Versions of Spot It!

Spot It! comes in several versions, including Holiday Spot it!, Disney Princess, Frozen Fever, Halloween, and Harry Potter. Disney Spot it! also comes in a Disney Villains version, and Frozen Fever has a second version with alternate symbols to play the game with.

Holiday Spot it! was the first expansion to this card game, released in 2012. This version features Christmas-related symbols such as Santa Claus, wreaths, Christmas trees, and candy canes.

Disney Princess Spot It! was released in 2013 as part of the Spot it! Challenge expansions. It includes various princesses from Disney movies such as Pocahontas and Rapunzel as well as other characters like Belle and Tiana. The symbols used on cards are different than those found in Holiday Spot it! and each card contains two character images instead of one.

Frozen Fever was the second Spot it! Challenge expansion, released in 2015. Like its predecessor, Disney Princess, it uses a different set of symbols than Holiday Spot it! and each card contains two images instead of one. However, Frozen Fever has characters from both the Frozen movie as well as characters from Disney’s short film Frozen Fever such as Anna and Elsa.

The Harry Potter expansions were also expansions to the Spot it! Challenge expansions and was released in September 2016 along with Disney Villains. The symbols used on cards are different than those found in Holiday Spot it!, Disney Princess, and Frozen Fever; each card contains two images instead of one just like all other expansions/variations of this game. There are five sets: “Heroes,” “Alumni,” “Romance,” “Action Shots,” and “Magical Places.”

The expansions mentioned above are not the only expansions to Spot it! This card game comes in various expansions you can add on or purchase separately from one another. These expansions as include Marvel Super Heroes, Star Wars Ep. 1-6, and many more.

Family Game Night With Spot It!

Spot It! will make a fantastic addition to any family game night. It is perfect for ages 7 and up. Compete as a family, and play as a family.

With Spot it!, you’ll enjoy seeing the happy expressions on family member’s faces as everyone works together at finding matching symbols before time runs out! Matching cards is both fun and educational for kids (and adults)!

So what are you waiting for? Prepare your family game night, and get ready to play Spot It! Buy Spot It! from Fantastic Games today.

 

Strawberry Sunset: The Sweetest of All

Some card games are made to be fast-paced games of skill, logic, and competition. Others incorporate beautiful artwork and graphic design that make the cards feel like a collector’s item. Strawberry Sunset has the best of both worlds in a card game that’s as beautiful as it is strategic. In this dynamic card game, you’re a gardener tasked with building the most beautiful and luscious strawberry garden around. It’s time to put your green thumb to the test!

Building Your Garden

The goal of Strawberry Sunset is to earn the most points by growing strawberry plants, creating a long garden path, and adding unique features to your garden like koi ponds or gnomes. You also want to keep the number of gravel patches within your garden to a minimum. Whoever manages to earn the most points throughout the game succeeds in creating the most beautiful garden out of all their neighbors and wins the game!

One thing that makes Strawberry Sunset a particularly difficult card game is that you can only play cards vertically, with each card having to cover at least one-quarter of an existing card. Similar to the way a flower grows from the bottom up, your garden will have to be built from the bottom up. The difficulty of this, of course, is that it makes planning ahead of time more of a challenge.

Players will take turns drawing cards from either the main deck or from the discard pile, also known as the “compost” pile. Players can either draw two face-down cards from the main deck or one face-up card from the compost pile. They are allowed to play only one card at a time to their garden, discarding any other cards into the compost pile.

Sunrise, Noon, and Sunset

The cards of Strawberry Sunset are divided into three times of day: sunrise, noon, and sunset. Each of these decks of cards is shuffled and then placed in a stack, with the sunrise cards on top, the sunset cards on the bottom, and noon cards in between. Each card has an intricate design on the back, although the three types of cards each contain different things.

Sunrise cards will usually consist of root parts of the strawberry plant as well as a few garden features. They’ll also contain cards representing gravel and path sections that run at different angles, allowing you to build a winding garden path and earn points. Noon cards will contain additional sections of the strawberry plant, while sunset cards will contain the strawberry fruits.

Players will take turns drawing and discarding cards as they build their garden. When they discard cards into the compost, they’re allowed to make separate stacks for sunrise, noon, and sunset cards. Once all of the cards in the main deck have been drawn, the game ends, and players have to tally up the points.

Scoring the Game

Players earn different amounts of points for each feature of their garden. For every completed strawberry plant, you’ll earn five points, while water features will earn you three points each. Every quadrant of your longest connected path will earn you one point, while you’ll lose two points for every gravel bed. You can also play Strawberry Sunset with an advanced scoring version, making the game slightly more complex and competitive.

Strawberry Sunset: A Sweet But Competitive Card Game

Strawberry Sunset is playable by 2-4 players, making it better suited for small groups or one-on-one games than for a big family game night. It’s suitable for ages 7 and up, which makes it a great game for parents to play with their kids or for the kids to play together. Playing time lasts around 10-20 minutes, as the game tends to move pretty quickly.

Strawberry Sunset stands out from other card games with its stunning artwork and impeccable card quality. Each of these linen-finished cards will feel like another intricate piece in your beautiful garden as you lay the cards down and watch it grow. The card game also comes with a few cards that detail the rules of the game in a way that’s easy to follow.

Buy Strawberry Sunset today and enjoy the sweet taste of victory!

 

Machi Koro: A Mayor’s Job is Never Easy

In the card game Machi Koro, you’ve just been elected the city’s first mayor. While this is certainly a cause for celebration, you’ll find that just because it’s a small town doesn’t mean that it’s going to be an easy job. Your citizens want to turn your sleepy little town into a big and bustling city complete with a theme park and radio tower. You’ll have to use your die to help build Machi Koro into a city fit for your residents.

Rolling the Dice

Machi Koro is played with a set of cards, a few coins, and a pair of dice. The goal of Machi Koro is to be the first mayor to build the four landmarks of your small town. Your citizens want a Train Station, a Shopping Mall, a Radio Tower, and an Amusement Park. Sadly, all you have right now is a Wheat Field and a measly Bakery. You’ll have to collect income and roll the dice to construct your buildings and win the game.

Each building has a certain coin cost in order to be built. Players begin with $3 in coins and will have to collect income as the game goes along. You can collect income any time that either you or another player rolls the die to a number matching the activation number on your establishments. 

There are four types of establishments. Each one is activated in a different way, allowing you to collect income whenever the die rolls on a certain number. Restaurants are activated on other player’s turns. For example, if you have a Café with an activation number of 4 and another player rolls a 4, then you get to collect coins from the active player. Primary industries are activated on any turn, allowing you to collect money from the bank. 

Secondary industries are activated on your turn, as are Major Establishments. However, while the activation of Secondary industries allows you to collect money from the bank, the activation of a Major Establishment allows you to perform whatever actions are described on the card.

Constructing Buildings

In addition to the four landmarks you need to construct in order to win the game, you’ll have to construct several types of buildings. You can construct one building at the end of your turn, choosing to build either a building in your supply or an unconstructed landmark. When you construct a building, you can start earning income on it. 

When you construct a landmark, however, this activates a special ability. The Train station allows you to roll up to two dice instead of just one. The Shopping Mall earns you additional income for establishments with cup or shop icons. The Amusement Park gives you the ability to take two turns when you roll doubles, while the Radio Tower lets you roll twice whenever you choose.

Machi Koro Expansions and Sequels

Machi Koro has released a few expansions and sequels that give this dice and card game new themes and mechanics. Machi Koro: Harbor Expansion adds variety by adding three more landmarks, including City Hall, the Harbor, and the Airport. It also allows for an optional fifth player. Machi Koro: Millionaire’s Row adds a new Renovation mechanic, stopping certain establishments in your supply from being activated.

Machi Koro Fussball forces you to construct a stadium to host the World Cup, making it the perfect sequel card game for soccer lovers. There’s also a fun sequel card game called Machi Koro: Bright Lights, Big City that turns your small little town into the hottest tourist destination around! This sequel game also accommodates up to 5 players and features an even faster pace.

Build Your City from Scratch with Machi Koro

Machi Koro is playable by 2-4 players, although some of the expansions and sequels do allow an optional fifth player. It’s suitable for ages 10 and up, so younger players can easily join in on the fun of rolling the dice and collecting the cute little coin tokens. Playing time lasts around 30 minutes, which is perfect for getting a short round in on a weeknight.

Buy Machi Koro today and enjoy the simplicity of being a small-town mayor!

 

Runes and Regulations: Bring a Little Magic to the Neighborhood

If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to add a little magic into the mundanity of life, never fear.  Runes & Regulations lets you experience all the wonder of a fearsome dragon combined with the passive-aggressiveness of a suburban unicorn.  In this one-of-a-kind card game, you’ll have to master the magical arts if you want to summon 5 Mythical Creatures and win the game.

Players will activate enchanted Runes, cast magical Spells, and summon fantastical Creatures all while following the restrictive Regulations of the local Homeowners Association.  Do you have the guts to Hex your neighbors and fight your way to the top in this dynamic card game?

Summoning Mythical Creatures

The goal of Runes & Regulations is to collect 5 different Mythical Creatures on your lawn.  This includes such beauties as the Rune-Eating Dragon, the Spoiled Unicorn, and the always delightful Griffin With a Tiny Head.  The first person to collect all 5 Mythical Creature cards wins the game, so you’ll have to battle Hexes and the Runes in order to build your magical menagerie.

Each creature has different triggers and effects listed on the card underneath a quirky drawing of the magical animal.  For example, if you have the Fetching Pegasus on the lawn, anytime you try to cast a spell you must first discard one of your cards.  The Rune-Eating Dragon, true to its name, will destroy a Rune anytime it enters your lawn.  

Runes are another interesting component of the game that you can trigger when someone else tries to make a play.  The Toastinator 2000 forces a player to draw 2 cards instead of discarding one, while the Gnasty Gnome will destroy a Mythical Creature instead of allowing it to be stolen from your lawn.  There’s no mercy in Gnome-land!

Hexes and Homeowners Associations

In addition to Runes, which can be cast on the other players, Runes & Regulations allows you to also Hex other players’ Mythical creatures directly and turn them into ordinary shrubbery.  The card Just For the Hex of It will simply Hex another player’s Mythical Creature, while the Sparkly Griffin will also cast a spell at the same time.

Players have to avoid hexing themselves with the spinner, which gives you a one in six chance of hexing one of the Mythical Creatures on your lawn.  Make sure you avoid landing on number two and screwing up a last-minute win!

Lastly, players will have to keep in mind the Regulations of the Homeowners Association or face their bureaucratic wrath.  Every once in a while you’ll be hit with random Regulations such as Regulation 5, which forces each player to discard a card every time a Creature enters their lawn.  Make sure you keep an eye on the Regulations in play to avoid being penalized!

Nefarious Neighbor Expansion

Runes & Regulations comes with an optional Nefarious Neighbor expansion that opens the original card game up to 5-8 players.  This card game expansion adds the new element of a dark sorcerer into the game, forcing everyone else to either team up against them or fight amongst themselves.  This evil entity will use their own standalone deck to steal Creatures from the other players and turn them into freaks of nature.

The rest of the players will have additional cards they can use to fight back against the Nefarious Neighbor.  Players will get player role cards that give them secret alternative win conditions, allowing you to sneak your way to victory without collecting 5 Mythical Creatures.  This card game expansion adds a new layer of depth to the original game and makes it perfect for bigger groups who want a little more action.

Runes and Regulations: Runes, Hexes, and Magic Abound

Runes & Regulations is a 2-4 player card game, although the Nefarious Neighbor expansion allows you to play with up to 8 players.  This card game is suitable for ages 6 and up, as the gameplay mechanics are family-friendly and relatively easy to understand.  Playing time lasts around an hour, although it will likely go on for longer if you use the expansion.

Buy Runes & Regulations today and enjoy the mythical delights of these fantastic creatures!

 

Skip-Bo: Don’t Skip this Classic Card Game

Skip-Bo is one of the great classic card games. As you draw different colored and numbered cards, you’ll have to figure out the best placement for each card in order to clear out your deck and not run yourself into a corner. Skip-Bo is a splendid mix of both strategy and fun, giving you just enough opportunity to interfere with the other players while focusing on your own agenda. Don’t miss out on the fast-paced fun of Skip-Bo!

Whittling Down Your Stock Pile

The goal of Skip-Bo is to get rid of all the cards in your stockpile. If you’re playing with 2-4 players, then each player will have 30 cards in their stockpile. With 5-6 players, the recommended stockpile is 20. Either way, players will have to put down their cards in the building piles and discard piles if they want to be the first to clear their hand and win the game.

Cards are numbered from 1 to 12, with a wild Skip-Bo card that can be used in place of any numbered card. At the beginning of each turn, players will draw cards so that they have a hand of 5. They will then play cards from either their hand, their stockpile, or the top of one of their discard piles. Players are allowed to continue their turn until they run out of cards to play, at which point they must discard onto one of their four discard piles.

Building vs. Discarding

The strategy of Skip-Bo comes from knowing where to build and how to discard. There are very specific rules as to what can be played into the building pile, as they can only be started with either a 1 or a wild Skip-Bo card. Building piles must then be played up to the number 12, at which point they can be discarded for a new pile to begin. 

You want to play the cards from your stockpile as quickly as possible, but you don’t want to set the next player in the line up for success. You also want to discard in the best possible order so that you have access to your cards when you need them. The best strategy is to have a discard pile of the same cards so that you can access the card whenever you need it. You may not be able to keep this going as the game goes on, however.

The next best strategy is to create piles in descending order, putting the smallest number on top. This means that if you have a discard pile that goes from 2-6 and you need a 2, you can go ahead and play your way through the discard pile. Just make sure you don’t find yourself in dire need of one of the cards in the middle, otherwise, you’ll be out of luck!

Skip-Bo Alternate Versions

Skip-Bo is a classic card game that has been released in many different forms over the years. The Skip-Bo Dice Game turns the luck of the draw into the luck of the dice. This portable dice game sets players on a mission to collect the most stars by rolling dice to fill in their build piles. It comes with dry-erase boards that players can use to record their rolls and collect stars.

There’s also Skip-Bo Junior, which reduces the stockpile to only 10-15 cards and the draw pile to only 3 cards. This simplifies the game for younger players and reduces the playing time to only 10-15 minutes. Pocket Skip-Bo is a travel version of the card game that also reduces the number of overall cards to make the game more portable.

Skipping Along with Skip-Bo

Skip-Bo is playable by 2-6 players, which makes it best suited for smaller groups or one-on-one games. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, so it’s a good game to play with younger players to introduce them to the mechanics of card games. Playing time lasts around 20 minutes, although you’ll definitely want to play several rounds once you get going.

Skip-Bo is a perfect card game to play on family vacations or lazy Saturday mornings. Buy Skip-Bo today and enjoy the fast-paced fun of this classic card game!

 

Sushi Go: Get on a Roll

If you’re a fan of the card-drafting mechanisms of games like 7 Wonders, then you’ll love the fast-paced card game Sushi Go. This card game has the same “draft and pass” dynamic but gets rid of all of the complex rules to provide you with 20 minutes of fun. Anyone can pick up the rules of Sushi Go as you collect cards to build the tastiest dishes and earn the most points. Just make sure to save room for dessert!

What’s for Dinner?

The way that Sushi Go works is by card drafting, in which you have to collect the best combination of cards to earn the most points. Each card represents a different ingredient in a sushi dish, allowing you to collect things like egg, salmon, or squid to create dishes for your meals. You’ll earn different points for different ingredients, as well as bonus points for certain combinations such as steaming dumplings or spicy sashimi.

The game is played in three distinct rounds representing three different meals. During each round, players will pick up the cards they get dealt and choose one of the cards to play. Then, they’ll pass the rest of the cards to the left, allowing the next player to choose one of those cards to play next. This goes around until all of the cards from everyone’s hands have been played.

This unique method of gameplay forces you to share decks with the other players, pulling out whichever cards will boost your points while trying not to leave cards that will help your competition. You’ll have to keep an eye on what the rest of the competition is trying to build if you want to prevent them from earning extra points for things like nigiri or wasabi.

Special Cards

In addition to the standard ingredient cards, there are a few special cards that make the game even more challenging. Sushi Roll cards each come with 1-3 rolls on top, earning extra points for the player with the most rolls by the end of the round. Chopsticks don’t earn you any points, but they do allow you to play two cards from the deck in a later hand.

Wasabi and Nigiri work together, as Wasabi cards will triple the value of your Nigiri. For example, if you make a Squid Nigiri and add Wasabi, you earn nine points, which is triple the amount of points that a Squid Nigiri is normally worth. However, Wasabi cards earn you no points on your own, so make sure you strategize accordingly if you don’t want to end up with a useless card.

One special type of card in Sushi Go is the Pudding card, which does not get scored until the end of the game. Once you’ve finished all three meals, everyone scores the number of Pudding cards they have. Whoever has the most earns a whopping six extra points, while the person with the least loses six points.

Sushi Go Expansions and Spinoffs

The makers of Sushi Go have released an expansion to the original card game called Sushi Go Party! that turns your average night out at the sushi restaurant into a full-on party. This card game expansion adds 20 new dishes including party platters of mega maki, super sashimi, and endless edamame. It also allows up to eight players to join in on the fun.

Sushi Roll is a dice-based version of the original card game that lets fate decide what’s for dinner. You’ll load up a conveyor belt with special sushi dice, with each player picking one and passing the rest. You can reroll the dice with the help of a menu, while chopsticks allow you to swap your dice with one of your opponents.

Sushi Go: A Card Game for Sushi-Lovers

Sushi Go is playable by 2-5 players, although the Sushi Go Party! expansion allows up to 8 players to enjoy the game. It’s suitable for ages 8 and up, as it’s really easy to comprehend the rules of the game. Playing time lasts around 15 minutes, but it’s pretty fun to go through multiple rounds. Buy Sushi Go today and enjoy the delectable dishes of your favorite Japanese cuisine!

 

Killer Bunnies: It’s a Battle of Bunnies

What’s more cute and cuddly than an adorable little bunny? If you’re asking that question, chances are you’ve already lost the game! In Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, you’ll learn that bunnies can be more vicious than meets the eye. This cutthroat card game forces you to collect weapons and build an army of lethal bunnies to wipe out the competition and collect the elusive Magic Carrot. Do you have what it takes to engage in bunny warfare?

Finding the Magic Carrot

The object of Killer Bunnies is to collect as many Carrots as possible in an effort to find the Magic Carrot. However, you’ll have to make sure you have at least one surviving bunny by the end of the game in order to win. You’ll have to balance collecting Carrots with fighting off the other bunnies if you want to make it through the bunny carnage alive.

Killer Bunnies uses a few decks of cards, including a large Carrot deck, a small Carrot deck, and a third deck that players will draw from throughout the game. These cards will include bunnies of different colors and types, Weapons, and draw Carrot cards. There are also cards that have special effects like Heavenly Halo or Bunny Abducting Aliens that add a nice bit of humor to the game.

There are a few ways you can earn extra moves on your turn. By playing a certain combination of bunnies or drawing certain cards, you can leap ahead of the competition and upend your opponent’s strategy.

The card game ends once the last of the large Carrot cards is picked up. Then, the Magic Carrot is determined by whichever player has the large Carrot card that matches the card on the bottom of the small Carrot deck. This means that the winner is chosen randomly, but that the more Carrots you collect, the more likely you are to win.

Defending Your Bunnies

While the overall objective of Killer Bunnies is to collect Carrot cards and find the Magic Carrot, the main gameplay involves waging war with your bunnies. You play your bunnies by placing them within the Bunny Circle, waging war against the other bunnies on the board. You’ll need to buy, trade, and negotiate with the other players if you want to make it through long enough to see the end of the game.

Most of the cards must be played in the Rabbit Run, which holds two cards at a time. This means that cards will take two turns to actually get into play, giving you a chance to plan ahead and guess which cards your opponents currently have on the docket. However, some cards are either Special or Very Special, which means you can play them right out of your hand. 

Killer Bunnies Sequels

In addition to Killer Bunnies and the Quest for the Magic Carrot, there are a few sequels and expansions that can expand the game into all-out bunny warfare. Killer Bunnies and the Conquest of the Magic Carrot can either be played on its own or integrated into the original game. It has the same goal as the first game, but it contains extra booster packs for added variety.

There’s also a non-collectible card game version of Killer Bunnies called Kinder Bunnies: Their First Adventure that is geared towards young children. This spinoff card game features more simplistic gameplay that eschews the bunny-killing in favor of teaching kids to avoid safety hazards as they collect Carrots. The bright graphics and fun activities make it a perfect card game for teaching kids about skills like reading and teamwork.

Killer Bunnies: May the Best Bunny Win

Killer Bunnies is playable by 2-8 players, so it’s a great card game for any size group. It’s suitable for ages 12 and up due to the somewhat dark humor of the bunny-killing, although the mechanics are simple enough for children as young as 8. Playing time lasts around 45 minutes, which is a decent amount of time to really get into it without growing tired of the game.

Channel your inner predator and buy Killer Bunnies today

 

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